Cybersecurity: Employees Are the First Line of Defense

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Cybercriminals are becoming more focused on users of company networks as a weak link in the security infrastructure chain. Secure web gateways, anti-virus tools, malware scanners, spam quarantines, and other technologies help filter out malicious content and defend against a growing variety of threats, but technology alone cannot stop humans from clicking on the wrong links.

Gone are the days when cybersecurity was the sole responsibility of the corporate IT department. Cyber safety programs are a best human resources practice and should be included in new employee onboarding and ongoing training awareness programs. HR might even consider incentive plans for helping keep networks safe.

Why? Employees are vulnerable to malware through their use of company email, the web, social media, instant messaging, and other communication and network software. Employees must be able to spot the types of attacks that may compromise company networks and be ready to use best practices against data breaches and malware infiltration as part of the organization’s overall risk prevention program.

How Pervasive is the Threat?

According to Michael Osterman of Osterman Research, Inc., there is more than a one-in-four chance that a user will mistakenly click on a phishing email and infect a corporate network. Costs to affected companies are steep. A recent example is the city of Atlanta, where a single ransomware infection cost the city more than $2.6 million. Trend Micro predicts worldwide losses from business email compromise (BEC) attacks at more than $9 billion in 2018.

Osterman Research conducted a study of organizations that had been victims of security incidents between March 2017 and March 2018 and found:

  • 9% were victims of phishing attacks that successfully infected systems with malware.

  • 25% had targeted email attacks launched from a compromised account that infected a network endpoint with malware.

  • 25% had sensitive/confidential information accidentally leaked through email.

  • 1% suffered targeted email attacks launched from a compromised account that successfully stole a user’s account credentials.

  • 1% had files encrypted because of a successful ransomware attack.

  • 2% saw malware infiltrate internal systems without being able to pinpoint the source of attack.

  • 2% had one or more systems successfully infiltrated through a “drive-by” malware attack from employee web surfing.

  • 3% had a CEO fraud/BEC email attack that successfully tricked one or more employees in the organization.

  • 7% had sensitive/confidential information accidentally or maliciously leaked through a cloud-based file sharing tool like Dropbox.

  • 8% were victims of sensitive/confidential information accidentally or maliciously leaked through a social media or cloud application.

One reason we are seeing increased vulnerability to cyberattacks stems from a growing attack “surface,” or possible entry points for malware and other malicious attacks. Most employees use multiple company-provided hardware and software products that widen that attack surface. These represent ingress points for various types of threats and often are a more serious problem because their use is not as well controlled by IT, if they’re controlled at all.

Cyberthreats Aimed at Employees

What types of threats should your employees be trained to spot so that they think before they click? Here are the most common ones:

Phishing emails. These are relatively unfocused email messages designed to collect sensitive information, such as login credentials, credit card information, Social Security numbers, and other valuable data. Phishing emails pretend to come from trustworthy sources like banks, credit card companies, shippers, and other sources with which potential victims have established relationships. More sophisticated phishing attempts use corporate logos and other identifiers to fool potential victims into believing the emails are genuine.

Spearphishing emails. These are targeted phishing attacks typically focused on one company or affinity group (such as an industry organization), reflecting the fact that a cybercriminal has studied the target and crafted a message designed to have a high degree of believability and a potentially high open rate.

Consumer file sync and share tools. Productivity tools like Dropbox, Microsoft OneDrive, and Google Drive, which let users make files available on all desktop, laptop, and mobile platforms, generally are safe but can be targeted by sophisticated criminals as an entry point. For example, when an employee accesses corporate files on a home computer that doesn’t have current anti-virus software, the employee can inadvertently infect these files with malware. When files are synced back to the employee’s work computer, malware can infect the network because it may have bypassed corporate email, web gateway, and other defenses.

Watering holes. In these social engineering attacks, cybercriminals identify websites they would like to infiltrate and that employees might visit on a regular basis. They infect these sites with malware.

Malicious Internet advertising (malvertising). This is designed to distribute malware through advertising impressions on websites.

User errors. Users sometimes inadvertently install malware or compromised code on their computers. This can occur if they install ActiveX controls, download a codec, install various applications intended to address some perceived need (such as a capability that IT does not support), or respond to scareware attempts that prey on users who are trying to protect their platforms from viruses and other malware.

Mobile malware. The growing use of smartphones and tablets is increasingly being exploited by cybercriminals. Most infections impact Android devices.

Compromised search engine queries. Valid queries can be hijacked by cybercriminals to distribute malware when employees perform web searches. This type of attack relies on poisoning results, leading to the display of malware-laden sites during these searches. This is particularly effective for popular search terms, such as information on celebrities, airline crashes, natural disasters, and other “newsy” items.

Mobile copycat apps. Some mobile applications are distributed through vendor-based and third-party stores that offer varying levels of security. If the store lacks stringent standards, serious security risks like distribution of copycat apps and malware that can cause infections when downloaded can occur.

Botnets. These are the source of many successful hacking and phishing attacks against high-profile targets. A CenturyLink Threat Research Labs study for a 2018 threat report tracked an average of 195,000 threats per day from botnets impacting an average of 104 million unique targets, from large servers to handheld devices, that steal sensitive data and launch network attacks impacting businesses worldwide.

Ransomware. In this particularly malicious form of attack, a cybercriminal can encrypt all files on a hard disk and then demand ransom for access to a decryption key. Victims who choose not to pay the ransom quickly will have their files remain encrypted permanently. Cryptolocker, a common variant of ransomware, typically extorts a few hundred dollars per incident and normally is delivered through email with a PDF or .zip file disguised as a shipping invoice or some other business document.

Hacking. With this form of cyberattack, cybercriminals use many techniques to breach corporate defenses.

Think Before You Click

Train employees to become the first line of defense in the network security risk prevention infrastructure. First, remind them to physically protect devices by not leaving them unattended or in unsecure areas, including locked cars. Focus training on identifying the types of malware they may encounter and how to escalate attempts to the IT professionals for resolution. Use a catchy slogan, like “think before you click,” to create engagement and promote awareness.

Here are some simple training tips:

  • Be skeptical of any email, web page, or social media post that appears to be even remotely suspicious, makes an offer that is too good to be true, or contains strange information.

  • Ask questions. Michael Osterman recommends asking these questions when viewing emails:

    • Do you recognize the sender’s email address?

    • Do you recognize anyone else copied on the email?

    • Are others in the email seemingly from a random group of people or do their last names all begin with the same letter?

    • Is the domain in the email address spelled correctly or is it simply close to the actual URL (e.g., bankofamerica.com vs. bankofarnerica.com).

    • Would you normally receive an email from this individual or organization?

    • Does the subject line make sense?

    • Is the email a “response” to an email you never sent (e.g., does it begin with “re:”)?

    • Does the email contain an attachment that does not make sense in the context of the email or sender?

    • Does the attachment end in “.exe,” “.zip,” or some other possibly dangerous attachment type?

    • Did you receive an email at an unusual time, such as 3 a.m. on a Sunday?

    • Is the sender asking you to keep the contents of this email or requests within it a secret?

    • Does the email contain spelling or grammatical errors?

    • Is there even a hint of extortion in the email, such as a request to look at compromising or embarrassing photos of you or someone else?

  • Review quarantined messages carefully before bringing them out of quarantine. Most anti-spam solutions capture phishing emails correctly.

  • Don’t click on a link in an email or open an attachment until you are certain it is valid.

  • Never use USB flash drives from unknown sources.

  • Set strong passwords. Change passwords regularly.

  • Use password protection on every electronic and mobile device.

  • Intentionally use wrong information for security questions.

  • Keep security software up to date on personal devices.

  • For mobile devices:

    • Disable auto usernames and passwords. This reduces the risk of having personal data accessed if the device is lost or stolen.

    • Know how to wipe your data if your device is lost or stolen.

    • Be careful when using public Wi-Fi networks, especially with insecure networks that do not require a password.

    • Use safe stores for downloading mobile applications.

  • For social media:

    • Don’t overshare personal information on social media.

    • Turn off location services.

    • Be careful clicking on links, liking, and sharing them.

Cyber Risk Prevention is Everyone’s Job

Don’t put it off — take the time to implement or enhance security awareness training for employees, contractors, and others who interact with corporate systems and data sources. Create a stronger line of defense against increasingly sophisticated cyber threats now. Preventing even one employee from making an honest mistake and clicking on the wrong link could save the business from reputational and financial losses. Clients will appreciate having the information to protect their home computers and personal devices, too!

This article was originally posted on ThinkHR.com.

IRS Announces 2019 Retirement Plan Contribution Limits | North Carolina Employee Benefits

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On November 1, 2018, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released Notice 2018-83announcing cost-of-living adjustments affecting dollar limits for pension plans and other retirement-related items for tax year 2019. Many pension plan limits will change next year because the increase in the cost-of-living index has met the statutory thresholds that trigger their adjustment. Other items, however, will remain the same. The following is a summary of the limits for 2019.

For 401(k), 403(b), and most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plans:

  • The elective deferral (contribution) limit increases from $18,500 to $19,000 for 2019.

  • The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in these plans remains at $6,000.

For individual retirement arrangements (IRAs):

  • The limit on annual contributions has not changed for many years. For 2019, however, it increases from $5,500 to $6,000.

  • The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment so it remains $1,000 for 2019.

For simplified employee pension (SEP) IRAs and individual/solo 401(k) plans:

  • Elective deferrals increase to $56,000 for 2019, based on an annual compensation limit of $280,000 (up from the 2018 amounts of $55,000 and $275,000).

  • The minimum compensation that may be required for participation in a SEP remains unchanged at $600 for 2019.

For savings incentive match plan for employees (SIMPLE) IRAs:

  • The contribution limit on SIMPLE IRA retirement accounts increases to $13,000 for 2019 (from $12,500 for 2018).

  • The SIMPLE catch-up limit remains unchanged at $3,000 for 2019.

For defined benefit plans:

  • The basic limitation on the annual benefits under a defined benefit plan is increased to $225,000 for 2019 (from $220,000 for 2018).

Other changes:

  • Highly-compensated and key employee thresholds:

    • The threshold for determining “highly compensated employees” increases to $125,000 for 2019 (from $120,000 for 2018).

    • The threshold for officers who are “key employees” in a top-heavy plan increases to $180,000 for 2019 (from $175,000 for 2018).

  • Social Security cost of living adjustment: In a separate announcement, the Social Security Administration stated that the taxable wage base will increase to $132,900 for 2019, an increase of $4,500 from the 2018 taxable wage base of $128,400. Thus, the maximum Social Security tax liability will increase for both employees and employers.

This article originally appeared on ThinkHR.com.

Are You Ready for Election Day? | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

Election Day is next Tuesday, November 6. Do you know what provisions, if any, you must make to accommodate your employees’ rights to vote? Time off for voting is not a federal requirement; however, 30 states have voting leave laws impacting the workplace.

These state laws vary significantly. Not all leave is required to be paid, and the amount of time varies. For some states it’s described as “reasonable time” necessary to vote, and in other states the law specifically states two, three, or even four hours to vote. Furthermore, some states, such as California and New York, require you to post notices of employees’ rights for time off to get to the polls.

Twelve of the 30 states also impose penalties for employers who prohibit employees from voting. For example, Colorado and New York employers could lose their corporate charter and Arizona, Missouri, and Kansas supervisors could face fines up to $2,500. While 20 states and the District of Columbia do not have voting leave laws in place, there are other provisions you should be aware of when it comes to your employees exercising their voting rights.

Even if your state doesn’t have a law in place requiring you to provide voting leave, that does not preclude you from having a company policy in place that provides voting leave. In addition to offering employees time on election day to vote, you could also remind employees about absentee or early voting options in your community.

Be ready for the midterm elections this November by knowing your time off rules and encourage your employees to exercise their civic duty to vote!

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8 Tips for Handling Tough Employee Conversations | North Carolina Employee Benefits

We all get cold feet when it comes to addressing difficult issues with colleagues in the workplace. It’s stressful, and you just can’t help but think of all of the ways that a well-meaning conversation could go sideways. You worry about the longer-lasting effects of a damaged work relationship but know that you must correct problematic work performance or behaviors before they get out of control.

Uncomfortable conversations about personal behaviors and poor performance are tough, and putting them off just allows the problems to worsen. Use your knowledge of the situation and put together the right combination of management skills to tackle the talk now.

Imagine these all-too-familiar employee situations that you know you need to address but don’t think you have the wisdom (or can’t muster up the courage) to handle:

  • The “No Good Deed Goes Unpunished” situation. For the past several months, one of your team members has been underperforming, and it has dragged down your business unit’s productivity. The underperforming employee has shared that she has a number of family and financial issues and is trying her hardest to stay ocused on work because she needs this job and loves the company. She lives your company values and is well-liked by her co-workers. Everyone feels bad for her situation and has been picking up the slack, but they are growing resentful of the extra work with no end in sight. You’ve been trying to be kind by avoiding the issues as her performance has slid from bad to worse. It is now impacting your company’s overall performance and degrading the employee relations climate.

  • The “Bad Behavior, Great Performer” situation. One of your employees consistently exceeds his production goals at the expense of the company culture. He is highly critical of others, issues demands from other work teams without regard for their other priorities, and employees grudgingly drop everything to deliver on impossible deadlines because they believe that they cannot push back. It’s all about him and his performance. He is regularly recognized by the company leadership for being the top producer, and employee complaints to management about his behavior have not been addressed. While production goals are good, your company culture is sinking and you’re starting to see increased absenteeism and turnover among your staff.

Don’t Overlook the Signals

In addition to employee resentment and lost productivity, there’s a bottom-line impact for not tackling these tough talks at the right time and in the right manner. The key is to pay attention to the signals and not feed the problem with neglect.

In the first scenario, trying to be a kind and sensitive boss worked in the beginning but is now backfiring. At first the team worked together to help their struggling colleague, but without a plan to fix the problem in the longer term, it created three serious issues for you to fix: employee morale, lack of confidence in your leadership for missing the signals of “team fatigue,” and not having a plan to keep the team on track — all resulting in lost productivity.

The best thing you can do in situations like these is to work with the struggling employee to develop a plan that puts her back on track or helps her consider alternatives if necessary. This type of conversation requires sensitivity along with some firmness because you need to steer the conversation from the personal issues back to actionable work deliverables.

In my experience dealing with circumstances like the second scenario, typically management allows the top performer’s behavior to go unchecked for fear that if the employee is corrected his performance will suffer or he will quit the company. While there may be an element of truth to those concerns if the individual is unwilling to accept constructive feedback, the bigger fear should be for the company’s culture, employee erosion of trust and confidence in the leadership team, and the motivation, performance, and retention of the other company employees if the behavior is not changed.

Often the top performer continues to use the same work patterns that have been successful and isn’t even aware of the impact on others. Addressing the issues sensitively so that he can make personal changes has the potential to create even higher levels of team unity and performance.

What Signals are You Looking For?

For starters, watch your team’s interactions with each other, be sure that each team member understands their key performance objectives, and take the time to “check in” regularly and solicit feedback about the job, work team, and overall company with each employee.

Having direct conversations on a regular basis helps you nip problems in the bud and shows your employees that you care about their concerns. You also learn each other’s communication patterns so that when it comes time to have that awkward or difficult conversation, you both are less uncomfortable.

Groups where team members work remotely increase the chances that signals can be missed. When telecommuting is coupled with the use of instant messaging and other forms of communications in place of direct face-to-face or voice communications, the sender’s well-intentioned messages may get lost in translation. Be sure to follow up any electronic communications with a direct phone call or meeting.

Eight Tips for Tackling These Conversations

Strategies to manage conflicts with subordinates are not fully taught in business classes. More common are courses addressing project conflicts, where the focus is on fixing the “what” of the problem, such as resetting priorities, changing business plans, or repairing broken systems or processes. There are fewer tools focusing on how teams communicate and repairing broken business relationships. Preparation and planning are critical to get what you need from these hard conversations while keeping your relationship with the employee intact.

  1. Focus your own viewpoint first. If you start out thinking the conversation will be really hard, you’re going to be more anxious. Chances are the conversation will be harder. Instead, position this discussion as a means to enhance your relationship while helping your employee develop better skills, understand company priorities better, or work more positively on the team. Think about how you can deliver the difficult talking points with honesty, courage and fairness.

  2. Recognize the emotions you will be feeling. Are you disappointed in this employee? Angry about the problems they’ve caused? Scared that your conversation will damage your work relationship? Put your negative feelings aside and consider how you will frame the problem you need to discuss and how your employee may feel. Try to come at the discussion with consideration and compassion for their feelings and frame the conversation with a desire for the employee’s success. “John, we need to have a hard conversation today, and I’m feeling anxious because I want you to win. Please know that I am invested in your success and will work with you to make that happen.”

  3. Be intentional in planning the conversation, but don’t script it out so that your delivery sounds mechanical. Some business consultants suggest drafting a script and considering alternatives based on the employee’s reactions. In my experience, these conversations never go completely according to plan, and scripted conversations feel artificial. Instead, write down key points and plan as if you are just having a simple conversation with a colleague. Be prepared to provide specifics and pace your conversation so that you take time to gauge your employee’s reactions to your comments. Your employee may react defensively if you provide vague statements. Instead of saying, “Sue, people in the company are telling me that you are difficult to work with and have a bad attitude,” frame the issue with examples, such as, “Sue, I am concerned because I’ve noticed in the last four team meetings you arrived late and weren’t prepared with project updates. As a result, both Joe and Sam missed their deliverables, and you didn’t let any of us know in advance that the timeline was slipping.”

  4. Recognize that you own part of the problem, too. Your goal is to have a conversation between adults where each owns some responsibility for the issue and solving the problem. This takes the conversation from finding fault to finding solutions. “Rob, I realize now that you have too many priorities and I didn’t provide you with the resources to deliver on the project. I also realize that I avoided addressing the problem at the beginning of the project and let it go too long without discussing it with you.”

  5. Outline what you want changed. Don’t just discuss the problem; describe the end result you envision. Discuss realistic and achievable outcomes and be willing to offer resources and assistance as appropriate.

  6. Ask the employee for his or her viewpoints. The last thing you want is a one-sided conversation. Slow the pace of the conversation, observe the employee’s reactions to your comments, and ask for feedback and suggestions for solving the problem. You may learn new information about what may have caused the problem, and the employee could offer even better solutions than you thought possible. Throughout the conversation, look for areas of consensus and acknowledge the employee’s feelings and concerns. That shows respect.

  7. End the conversation on a positive note with an action plan. Thank the employee for working with you through the difficult discussion. Acknowledge that it was a tough conversation and express appreciation for the employee’s professionalism as you both work towards a better outcome. Develop a going-forward action plan to solve the problem. “Tom, this was a hard talk, and I know it wasn’t easy for you. You provided some good ideas for fixing the issue, and I appreciate your professionalism. You can do this, and I am here to help you win.”

  8. Close the loop and follow up. Give the employee a little time to reflect on the discussion, but no more than a day or two. Follow up and ask the employee if they would like to have another discussion to cover any additional information or clarification. Put the agreed-upon action plan in writing, schedule regular status meetings, and recognize progress and improved performance. Taking these steps demonstrates your respect for the employee and desire for them to succeed.

Keep the Conversation Going

Great managers keep the conversation going to ensure team members are aligned and supporting each other to create a healthy corporate culture and successful company. When problems arise, they have the tough conversations to get things back on track. Handling these discussions well takes courage as well as empathetic listening and communications skills. Pay attention to the signals, develop your communications plan, and you’ll be more confident in tackling your next tough employee communications challenge.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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Ask the Experts: Mandatory Flu Shots | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

While there is no law that prohibits employers from mandating flu shots, you should carefully determine if the benefits to your business outweigh the risks. Read the article to determine the best course of action, from incentives to suggestions about policy wording.

Look Backward to Plan Forward | North Carolina Employee Benefits

We have entered Open Enrollment season and that means you and everyone in your office are probably reading through enrollment guides and trying to decipher it all. As you begin your research into which plan to choose or even how much to contribute to your Health Savings Account (HSA), consider evaluating how you used your health plan last year. Looking backward can actually help you plan forward and make the most of your health care dollars for the coming year.

Forbes magazine gives the advice, “Think of Open Enrollment as your time to revisit your benefits to make sure you are taking full advantage of them.” First, look at how often you used health care services this year. Did you go to the doctor a lot? Did you begin a new prescription drug regimen? What procedures did you have done and what are their likelihood of needing to be done again this year? As you evaluate how you used your dollars last year, you can predict how your dollars may be spent next year and choose a plan that accommodates your spending.

Second, don’t assume your insurance coverage will be the same year after year. Your company may change providers or even what services they will cover with the same provider. You may also have better coverage on services and procedures that were previously not eligible for you. If you have choices on which plan to enroll in, make sure you are comparing each plan’s costs for premiums, deductibles, copays, and coinsurance for next year. Don’t make the mistake of choosing a plan based on how it was written in years prior.

Third, make sure you are taking full advantage of your company’s services. For instance, their preventative health benefits. Do they offer discounted gym memberships? What about weight-loss counseling services or surgery? How frequently can you visit the dentist for cleanings or the optometrist? Make sure you know what is covered and that you are using the services provided for you. Check to see if your company gives discounts on health insurance premiums for completing health surveys or wellness programs—even for wearing fitness trackers! Don’t leave money on the table by not being educated on what is offer

Finally, look at your company’s policy choices for life insurance. Taking out a personal life insurance policy can be very costly but ones offered through your office are much more reasonable. Why? You reap the cost benefit of being a part of a group life policy. Again, look at how your family is expected to change this year—are you getting married or having a baby, or even going through a divorce? Consider changing your life insurance coverage to account for these life changes. Forbes says that “people entering or exiting your life is typically a good indicator that you may want to revisit your existing benefits.”

As you make choices for yourself and/or your family this Open Enrollment season, be sure to look at ALL the options available to you. Do your research. Take the time to understand your options—your HR department may even have a tool available to help you estimate the best health care plan for you and your dependents. And remember, looking backward on your past habits and expenses can be an important tool to help you plan forward for next year.

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Gupton on the Role of an Employee Benefits Broker in the Opioid Crisis

Gupton’s work on the opioid crisis continues to get attention. October 9th, Employee Benefit Advisor Magazine published an article on Gupton’s motivators, statistics, current pushes, and ideas on how an employee benefit consultant can impact the opioid crisis.

Ask the Experts: Distributing ERISA Notices Electronically | North Carolina Employee Benefits

Question: Our company is getting ready for open enrollment. Can we distribute ERISA notices electronically instead of printing and delivering hard copies?

Answer: Yes, electronic delivery complies with ERISA’s disclosure rules – but certain conditions must be met.

First, whether delivered in hard copy or electronic media, ERISA requires preparing and furnishing materials “in a manner consistent with applicable style, format, and content requirements.” It is a good idea to test electronic documents to make sure the formatting and style are correct.

Secondly, materials must be furnished using “measures reasonably calculated to ensure actual receipt.” For instance, if using a traditional delivery method, such as first-class mail, be sure to follow up on any undelivered/returned mail.

For electronic delivery, the compliance rules work differently depending on whether the recipients have regular access to the employer’s electronic information system:

  • Regular access means the recipients use the system, such as the employer’s email system or intranet, as an integral part of their regular job duties. This may include employees who work from home or who are traveling. However, simply having access to a kiosk in a workplace common area does not qualify as having regular access.

  • Without regular access means all other recipients. This may include employees on leave as well as non-employees such as COBRA participants, retirees, and alternate payees. For this group, electronic delivery does not comply with ERISA unless the recipient first affirmatively consents to receive the material electronically, provides an electronic address, and reasonably demonstrates their ability to access the material in electronic form. Since the process to secure consent is fairly cumbersome, most employers choose to distribute materials to this group using traditional hard-copy methods instead of electronic delivery.

Both groups of recipients must be notified of their rights to receive paper copies of the documents (at no charge), and reasonable and appropriate steps must be taken to safeguard confidentiality of personal information related to benefits. A best practice is for employers to ensure return-receipt or notice of undelivered mail features are enabled. Employers may conduct periodic reviews or surveys to confirm receipt as well.

Just emailing documents or posting them on the company’s intranet or benefit administration portal is not enough. Each time an electronic document is furnished, a notice (electronic or paper) must be provided to each recipient describing the significance of the document.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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Medicare Part D Notices Due Oct. 15 | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

Are you an employer that offers or provides group health coverage to your workers? Does your health plan cover outpatient prescription drugs — either as a medical claim or through a card system? If so, be sure to distribute your plan’s Medicare Part D notice before October 15.

Purpose

Medicare began offering “Part D” plans — optional prescription drug benefit plans sold by private insurance companies and HMOs — to Medicare beneficiaries many years ago. People may enroll in a Part D plan when they first become eligible for Medicare.

If they wait too long, a late enrollment penalty amount is permanently added to the Part D plan premium cost when they do enroll. There is an exception, though, for individuals who are covered under an employer’s group health plan that provides creditable coverage. (“Creditable” means that the group plan’s drug benefits are actuarially equivalent or better than the benefits required in a Part D plan.) In that case, the individual can delay enrolling for a Part D plan while he or she remains covered under the employer’s creditable plan. Medicare will waive the late enrollment premium penalty for individuals who enroll in a Part D plan after their initial eligibility date if they were covered by an employer’s creditable plan. To avoid the late enrollment penalty, there cannot be a gap longer than 62 days between the creditable group plan and the Part D plan.

To help Medicare-eligible plan participants make informed decisions about whether and when to enroll in a Part D drug plan, they need to know if their employer’s group health plan provides creditable or noncreditable prescription drug coverage. That is the purpose of the federal requirement for employers to provide an annual notice (Employer’s Medicare Part D Notice) to all Medicare-eligible employees and spouses.

Employer Requirements

Federal law requires all employers that offer group health coverage including any outpatient prescription drug benefits to provide an annual notice to plan participants.

The notice requirement applies regardless of the employer’s size or whether the group plan is insured or self-funded:

  • Determine whether your group health plan’s prescription drug coverage is creditable or noncreditable for the upcoming year (2019). If your plan is insured, the carrier/HMO will confirm creditable or noncreditable status. Keep a copy of the written confirmation for your records. For self-funded plans, the plan actuary will determine the plan’s status using guidance provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

  • Distribute a Notice of Creditable Coverage or a Notice of Noncreditable Coverage, as applicable, to all group health plan participants who are or may become eligible for Medicare in the next year. “Participants” include covered employees and retirees (and spouses) and COBRA enrollees. Employers often do not know whether a particular participant may be eligible for Medicare due to age or disability. For convenience, many employers decide to distribute their notice to all participants regardless of Medicare status.

  • Notices must be distributed at least annually before October 15. Medicare holds its Part D enrollment period each year from October 15 to December 7, which is why it is important for group health plan participants to receive their employer’s notice before October 15.

  • Notices also may be required after October 15 for new enrollees and/or if the plan’s creditable versus noncreditable status changes.

Preparing the Notice(s)

Model notices are available on the CMS website. Start with the model notice and then fill in the blanks and variable items as needed for each group health plan. There are two versions: Notice of Creditable Coverage or Notice of Noncreditable Coverage and each is available in English and Spanish:

Employers who offer multiple group health plan options, such as PPOs, HDHPs, and HMOs, may use one notice if all options are creditable (or all are noncreditable). In this case, it is advisable to list the names of the various plan options so it is clear for the reader. Conversely, employers that offer a creditable plan and a noncreditable plan, such as a creditable HMO and a noncreditable HDHP, will need to prepare separate notices for the different plan participants.

Distributing the Notice(s)

You may distribute the notice by first-class mail to the employee’s home or work address. A separate notice for the employee’s spouse or family members is not required unless the employer has information that they live at different addresses.

The notice is intended to be a stand-alone document. It may be distributed at the same time as other plan materials, but it should be a separate document. If the notice is incorporated with other material (such as stapled items or in a booklet format), the notice must appear in 14-point font, be bolded, offset, or boxed, and placed on the first page. Alternatively, in this case, you can put a reference (in 14-point font, either bolded, offset, or boxed) on the first page telling the reader where to find the notice within the material. Here is suggested text from the CMS for the first page:

“If you (and/or your dependents) have Medicare or will become eligible for Medicare in the next 12 months, a federal law gives you more choices about your prescription drug coverage. Please see page XX for more details.”

Email distribution is allowed but only for employees who have regular access to email as an integral part of their job duties. Employees also must have access to a printer, be notified that a hard copy of the notice is available at no cost upon request, and be informed that they are responsible for sharing the notice with any Medicare-eligible family members who are enrolled in the employer’s group plan.

CMS Disclosure Requirement

Separate from the participant notice requirement, employers also must disclose to the CMS whether their group health plan provides creditable or noncreditable coverage. The plan sponsor (employer) must submit its annual disclosure to CMS within 60 days of the start of the plan year. For instance, for calendar-year group health plans, the employer must comply with this disclosure requirement by March 1.

Disclosure to CMS also is required within 30 days of termination of the prescription drug coverage or within 30 days of a change in the plan’s status as creditable coverage or noncreditable coverage.

The CMS online tool is the only method allowed for completing the required disclosure. From this link, follow the prompts to respond to a series of questions regarding the plan. The link is the same regardless of whether the employer’s plan provides creditable or noncreditable coverage. The entire process usually takes only 5 or 10 minutes to complete.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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Ask the Experts: FSA Limits | North Carolina Employee Benefits

Question: Our company offers flexible spending accounts (FSAs) for health care and dependent daycare. Our plan limits are the maximum amounts allowed by federal law. Will the IRS increase the limits for 2019? We hold open enrollment in November for employees to make their FSA elections for the following year.

Answer: The maximum annual limits for Dependent Care FSAs and Health Care FSAs are set forth under § 129 and § 125, respectively, of the Internal Revenue Code.

The § 129 (Dependent Care) limits do not change from year to year. They are currently $5,000, or $2,500 if married and filing separately, and they apply on a calendar-year basis. To change them would require a change in law, which is unlikely in the current Congress.

On the other hand, the maximum limit for elective contributions to a Health Care FSA (HFSA) may change from year to year depending on inflation. The limit applies on a plan-year basis and the HFSA limit for a 12-month plan year beginning in 2018 is $2,650. The limit is one of over 50 different tax provisions that is subject to annual cost-of-living or inflation adjustments. Each fall, the IRS announces any changes for the following year. The announcement usually is released in mid-October, which should give employers time to prepare 2019 enrollment materials.

Based on estimated inflation, it appears the HFSA limit will increase from $2,650 for plan years beginning in 2018 to $2,700 for plan years beginning in 2019. The increase will not be official, however, until the IRS announcement is released.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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Look Backward to Plan Forward | North Carolina Employee Benefits

We have entered Open Enrollment season and that means you and everyone in your office are probably reading through enrollment guides and trying to decipher it all. As you begin your research into which plan to choose or even how much to contribute to your Health Savings Account (HSA), consider evaluating how you used your health plan last year. Looking backward can actually help you plan forward and make the most of your health care dollars for the coming year.

Check out these four things to look at as you go into Open Enrollment season!

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Is Your Health Plan Affordable for 2019? | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

The Affordable Care Act’s employer shared responsibility provision — often called the employer mandate or “play or pay” — requires large employers to offer health coverage to their full-time employees or face a potential penalty. (Employers with fewer than 50 full-time and full-time-equivalent employees are exempt.) Large employers can avoid the risk of any play or pay penalties by offering all full-time employees at least one group health plan option that meets two standards: It provides minimum value and it is affordable.

Minimum value means the plan’s share of total allowed costs is at least 60 percent and the plan provides substantial coverage of physician services and inpatient hospital services.

Affordable means the employee’s required contribution (payroll deduction) for self-only coverage, if elected, does not exceed a certain percentage of the employee’s household income. The affordability percentage changes slightly each year based on the law’s indexing rule. For 2018, the percentage is 9.56 percent. For 2019, however, the percentage increases to 9.86 percent.

Although the change is minor, it means that employers may increase their plan’s employee-only contribution rate and still meet the affordability standard next year.

Determining Affordability

The first step in determining whether a group health plan option is affordable is to define the employee’s “income.” Employers do not know their workers’ total household income, so the play or pay rules offer employers three optional safe harbor methods to define income using information known to the employer. Employers may use any of the safe harbor methods. They also may use different methods for different classes (such as one method for hourly employees and another method for salaried employees), provided that the chosen method is applied uniformly to all employees in the class.

The three IRS safe harbor methods are:

1. Federal Poverty Line (FPL)

The FPL method is the easiest of the three methods. Multiply the mainland FPL amount for a single-member household by the affordability percentage, then divide by 12. As long as the self-only contribution rate does not exceed the resulting amount, the plan’s coverage is deemed affordable. For instance:

  • 2018: ($12,060 x 9.56%)/12 = $96.08 per month

  • 2019: ($12,140 x 9.86%)/12 = $99.75 per month

The FPL chart is updated every year in late January. For 2019 calendar-year health plans, the employer needs to refer to the current FPL amount ($12,140) since the new FPL amount will not be available until after the plan year starts. If the health plan year starts February 1, 2018 or later, however, the employer may refer to the new FPL amount which likely will be a little higher.

2. Rate of Pay

This is the most convenient method to define income when applied to hourly employees. Multiply the employee’s hourly rate of pay times 130 hours per month (regardless of how many hours he or she actually works), then multiply by the affordability percentage. As long as the self-only contribution rate does not exceed the resulting amount, the plan’s coverage is deemed affordable. For instance:

  • 2018: ($11* x 130) x 9.56% = $136.70 per month

  • 2019: ($11* x 130) x 9.86% = $140.99 per month

* Replace $11 with the hourly employee’s rate of pay.

For salaried employees, the rate of pay method is somewhat complicated so employers generally avoid using this method for non-hourly employees.

3. W-2

The W-2 method requires using current W-2 wages instead of looking back at the prior year. W-2 wages means the amount that will be reported in Box 1 of Form W-2. Pretax contributions, such as § 125 plan contributions and 401(k) or 403(b) plan deferrals, are not included in Box 1, so using the W-2 safe harbor method may understate the employee’s actual income. Coverage will be deemed affordable if, for each month of the plan year, the self-only contribution does not exceed the Box 1 amount multiplied by the affordability percentage.

Summary

Large employers can avoid the risk of potential penalties under the ACA’s play or pay rules by ensuring that they offer full-time employees at least one minimum value plan option that also is affordable. Affordable means the employee’s contribution to elect self-only coverage would not exceed a certain percentage of the employee’s income.

The percentage used to determine affordability changes from year to year is based on the law’s indexing formula. For 2018 plan years, the affordability percentage is 9.56 percent, but it increases to 9.86 percent for 2019 plan years. Employers and their advisors will want to keep this information in mind as they finalize their group health plan offerings and employee contribution rates for 2019.

Originally published www.thinkhr.com

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Back to School Time Off Tips | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

The coals from the Labor Day barbecues have cooled, the beach chairs have been returned to their sheds, the ice cream shops have scaled back their hours, and the white shoes have been set aside for the next nine months. Whatever the end of summer means to you, for millions of families, it signals the return to school for children in preschool through college.

This means your employees will likely need to take a few hours out of their workday occasionally to participate in their children’s education. Parents’ fall calendars are often packed with school events, parent-teacher conferences, and/or parent meetings – some of which will inevitably occur during their usual working hours – and any flexibility you give them to attend these events, or even volunteer in the classroom or chaperone a field trip, will be greatly appreciated.

Where it’s the law

Nine states and the District of Columbia have passed laws protecting parents’ rights to take small increments of time away from work to attend to school matters. They vary widely in their specifics regarding eligibility for leave, whether the time is paid or unpaid, and the amount of time available for use. (ThinkHR customers can get details about each state’s provisions by clicking the act titles listed below after logging into to your ThinkHR account.)

Even if it’s not the law

It’s a best practice to offer flexibility to all employees so that they can meet the obligations of daily life while still performing at their peak at work. It goes a long way toward making an employee feel good about where they work when they can see their child perform in a school play, take their dog to the vet, or accept an appliance delivery without worrying about missing a couple hours of work or needing to take a full day off.

The beginning of fall is a great time to review your established time off policies to see how you can accommodate parents and guardians who need to meet school obligations as well as giving all employees the flexibility to attend to the other small necessities of life.

In many cases, your established policies may not need to change. Depending on the needs of your workplace, your state laws, and the employee’s position, this could mean allowing employees to make up a few hours of work, take an extended lunch period, shift their schedule to start earlier or later to still get a full day in, or use personal, vacation, or PTO time in small increments.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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New Federal Contract Compliance Directives | North Carolina Employee Benefits

On August 24, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) announced the following three directives:

  • Guidance for Contractor Compensation PracticesDirective 2018-05 clarifies the OFCCP’s approach to conducting compensation evaluations, supports compliance and compensation self-analyses by contractors, and improves compensation analysis consistency and efficiency during compliance evaluations.
  • Contractor Recognition Programs: Directive 2018-06 establishes a contractor recognition program with awards that highlight best practices, a contractor mentoring program, and other initiatives that provide opportunities for contractors to collaborate or provide feedback to OFCCP.
  • Affirmative Action Program Verification Initiative: Federal contractors are legally required to take steps to ensure equal opportunity in their employment processes, including developing a written affirmative action program within 120 days of when the contract begins. Directive 2018-07 establishes a program for verifying compliance with these and other affirmative action obligations.

The OFCCP enforces federal laws that prohibit federal contractors and subcontractors from discriminating on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, or status as a protected veteran. In addition, contractors and subcontractors are prohibited from discriminating against applicants or employees because they inquire about, discuss, or disclose their compensation or that of others, subject to certain limitations.

Originally published www.thinkhr.com

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Short-Term Limited-Duration Insurance – In a Nutshell | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

On August 3, 2018, the Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Treasury (the Departments) published a Final Rule to expand the availability of short-term medical policies. Called short-term, limited-duration insurance (STLDI), the policies are marketed to individuals as an alternative to ACA-compliant plans. Currently a short-term policy is limited to less than three months, but the new rule will allow carriers to issue the policies for longer periods.

What is short-term limited-duration insurance (STLDI)?

Short-term, limited-duration insurance is a specific type of health coverage that is exempt from the ACA’s market reform rules. STLDI policies may exclude entire categories of benefits, such as prescription drugs, maternity, or mental health care, may impose coverage caps, and may reject applicants with pre-existing conditions. STLDI policies offer lower premiums than ACA-compliant plans because they provide less coverage and typically only accept healthy applicants.

Note that STLDI is not minimum essential coverage and does not satisfy the ACA’s individual mandate. The individual mandate (i.e., the requirement for individuals to have some form of minimum essential coverage) expires at the end of 2018, after which persons without adequate health coverage will no longer be exposed to potential IRS tax penalties.

What is the purpose of the new federal rule?

The existing rule defines “short term” as less than three months and limits the policy’s duration by prohibiting renewals that would go beyond the three-month period. The new rule, on the other hand, will allow carriers to issue STLDI policies for an initial term of up to 364 days, and allows extensions or renewals for up a total of 36 months. This is a significant change that is intended to expand access to low-cost limited-coverage options for individuals.

The new federal rule takes effect for STLDI policies issued October 2, 2018, or later. There is a catch, however. Insurance is subject to state insurance laws, and many states appear reluctant to adopt the new rule for policies issued in their state. Some states even prohibit short-term policies under the current federal rule. At last weekend’s National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) meeting, several state regulators expressed concerns about “junk insurance” or deceptive marketing practices that may lure consumers into purchasing substandard coverage.

Are employers affected by STLDI policies or the new rule?

No.

Employers are not directly affected by STLDI policies. The policies are marketed to individuals, where permitted by state insurance law; they are not group plans.

Some workers may consider STLDI options, or ACA-compliant individual insurance options, as an alternative to their employer’s group plan. In most cases, though, persons who buy individual insurance do so because they do not have access to an employer’s plan. Workers whose employment ends may also consider individual options as an alternative to COBRA.

What’s Next?

Over the coming weeks and months, state insurance regulators and state legislatures are expected to review their existing laws and regulations on short-term, limited-duration insurance and consider whether to adopt changes. Some states likely will choose to implement rules to support the new federal rule, while other states certainly will impose restrictions or continue to prohibit the sale of insurance products they consider to be substandard.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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DOL Updates the Employer CHIP Notice | North Carolina Employee Benefits

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has updated the model notice for employers to use to inform employees about the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). All employers with group health plans are required to distribute a CHIP notice at least once a year to employees living in certain states. There is no need to send another notice to workers who received the prior version in the past year, but employers should use the updated notice going forward. This also is a good time for employers to review their procedures for distributing CHIP notices.

The following are the most frequently asked questions we receive from employers about CHIP notices.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the purpose of the CHIP notice?
The CHIP notice informs benefits-eligible employees that their state’s CHIP or Medicaid program may offer premium assistance to help them pay for group health coverage at work. Many states offer some form of premium assistance to residents based on their family income. The updated notice includes contact information for each participating state (currently 37 states) and explains that persons approved for premium assistance have a special 60-day enrollment period to join their employer’s group plan without having to wait for the employer’s next annual enrollment period.

Does the CHIP notice requirement affect all employers?
All employers that offer a group health plan providing medical benefits, whether insured or self-funded, must consider the CHIP notice requirement. Each employer then will determine if it must distribute the notice depending on whether any of its employees live in one of the states listed in the notice.

Further, all group health (medical) plans must offer a special 60-day enrollment period when an employee becomes eligible for premium assistance (for the employee or a family member) from a state’s CHIP or Medicaid program.

Is the notice required for all employees or just for those enrolled in our group health plan?
The notice must be given to all employees living in any one of the listed states and eligible for the employer’s group health plan, whether or not currently enrolled. That is the minimum requirement. Many employers, however, choose to distribute the notice to all employees, regardless of benefits eligibility or location, to avoid the need for separate distributions when an employee’s status or location changes.

How do we prepare and distribute the notice? How often?
The DOL provides a model notice that employers can copy and distribute. Although employers have the option of creating their own notice to list only the states where their employees are located, most employers simply use the DOL model notice as it is. The model notice also is available in Spanish.

The notice must be distributed when employees initially become eligible for the employer’s health plan and then at least once a year thereafter. For convenience, most employers provide the notice at the same time as they distribute new hire materials and annual enrollment materials.

When combined with other materials, the CHIP notice must appear “separately and in a manner which ensures that an employee who may be eligible for premium assistance could reasonably be expected to appreciate its significance.” For instance, the notice may be a loose item in the same envelope with other material. If the notice is stapled inside other material, however, there should be a note on the top page or cover alerting the reader to the placement of the CHIP notice and its importance.

Do we have to mail out paper copies or can we distribute the notice electronically?
The notice may be sent by first-class mail. Alternatively, it can be distributed electronically if the employer follows the DOL’s guidelines for electronic delivery of group health plan materials. That means that the employer first must determine whether the intended recipient has regular access to the electronic media system (e.g., email) as an integral part of his or her job. If so, the notice can be sent electronically provided the employer takes steps to ensure actual receipt, along with notifying the employee of the material’s significance and that a paper copy is available at no cost.

For persons who do not have regular access to the electronic media system, the notice cannot be sent electronically unless the intended recipient provides affirmative consent in advance. The guidelines for obtaining advance consent are fairly cumbersome, so employers are advised to distribute paper copies in these cases.

Summary

Employers offering group health plans are encouraged to review their procedures for distributing CHIP notices. At a minimum, the notice must be given annually to all employees eligible for the employer’s health plan who live in any of the states listed in the notice. Many employers choose to distribute the notice to all workers in an abundance of caution. The DOL provides model notices in English and Spanish that do not need any customization, so employers can simply copy and distribute one or both versions as needed.

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Preparation Aids Prevention | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

Incidences of workplace violence are becoming more common and are all over the news. It’s not just high-profile headline cases that are a concern—it’s happening on a smaller scale in all kinds of businesses. Threats to workplaces can take many forms, from cyberbullying and workplace harassment to physical altercations and targeted violence.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that every year nearly 2 million U.S. workers are victims of workplace violence, with a total economic cost of more than $55 billion. According to the most recent National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, violence in the workplace increased 23 percent between 2015 and 2016 to become the second-most common category of workplace fatalities, behind transportation incidents.

Assessing elements of risk that may trigger violence, along with developing a prevention plan, is critical.

While a bill has been recently introduced in Congress relating to workplace violence in the healthcare industry, and some states address workplace violence in their safety regulations, there are no specific OSHA standards for workplace violence at the federal level outside of the OSHA General Duty Clause. This clause requires employers to provide their employees with a place of employment that is “free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious harm.”

If your clients experience acts of workplace violence or become aware of threats, intimidation, or other indicators suggesting that the potential for violence in the workplace exists, OSHA and state programs would expect them to implement a workplace violence prevention program combined with controls and training.

The good news is, you can help arm your clients with strategies for reducing the risk of workplace violence this summer.

Prevention is key

Assessing elements of risk that may trigger violence, along with developing a prevention plan, is critical. This starts with a complete evaluation of the organization’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats as they relate to the types of risks the organization might face. A review of the company’s strategic objectives and deliverables, the resources available to employees to accomplish these deliverables, and the physical layout of the facility are important elements to include in this evaluation.

Workplace violence preparation and prevention strategies

Hire right. Your clients’ businesses may be at risk due to the actions of their employees. Advise them to make good hiring decisions by clearly defining job requirements and thoroughly evaluating applicants. They should look carefully at resumes and job applications, probe gaps in applicants’ work histories, and verify education and work experience. Encourage them to conduct reference and background checks and be consistent with all applicants throughout the hiring process. That way, they can potentially avoid bad hires or negligent hiring claims.

Set clear expectations. When employees know what is expected of them, including behaviors important to the organization and performance standards, and those expectations are consistently enforced, they may experience less work-related stress and anxiety that can lead to hostility and violent outbursts.

Nurture an inclusive company culture. Studies show that in companies where employees feel like they are a part of the business and understand how their work contributes to the organization’s success, employees are more engaged and have more trust in their leaders and co-workers. Encourage your clients to focus on an inclusive culture built on strong values and it might result in fewer accidents, less absenteeism, and reduced risk for EPLI claims or workplace violence incidents.

Establish emergency preparedness plans. Advise your clients to develop emergency plans covering human-caused emergencies such as crime and violence, as well as hazards caused by natural disasters, outbreaks of disease, and accidents.

Establish safe reporting systems. Recommend that clients establish more than one method for employees to report any type of threat or issue that makes them feel unsafe in the workplace. These systems should include clear communication to employees that everyone is responsible for workplace safety, and there will be no retaliation for reporting safety concerns.

Provide workplace wellness programs. Some safety experts suggest that companies that demonstrate their commitment to their employees’ wellbeing through comprehensive wellness programs may reduce the risk of workplace violence. The rationale is that these programs help to defuse employee stress, anxiety, and unhealthy personal behaviors that can lead to violence.

Train, train, train. Every member of the team should be trained to know what to do in each type of emergency. In the case of workplace violence prevention, encourage your clients to train employees who have contact with the public about how to defuse potentially violent situations and protect themselves. Designate management team members to receive additional training to recognize the signs of employee distress — such as physical exhaustion, missing work commitments, more time out of the office, violent outbursts, isolating themselves from co-workers, or talking about hurting themselves or others — with the proper procedures for handling those situations. Well-trained team members who react quickly can save lives.

With the proper planning, systems, communications, and training, your clients can be better prepared to prevent or lessen the threats of workplace violence.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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Wearable Technology | North Carolina Employee Benefits

Don’t lie--we ALL love gadgets. From the obscure (but hilariously reviewed on Amazon) Hutzler 571 Banana Slicer to the latest iteration of the Apple empire. Gadgets and technology can make our lives easier, make processes faster, and even help us get healthier. Businesses are now using the popularity of wearable technology to encourage employee wellness and increase productivity and morale.

According to a survey cited on Huffington Post, “82% of wearable technology users in American said it enhanced their lives in one way or another.” How so? Well, in the instance of health and wellness, tech wearers are much more aware of how much, or how little, they are moving throughout the day. We know that our sedentary lifestyles aren’t healthy and can lead to bigger health risks long term. Obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, and Type 2 Diabetes are all side effects of this non-active lifestyle. But, these are all side effects that can be reversed with physically getting moving. Being aware of the cause of these problems helps us get motivated to work towards a solution.

Fitbit, Apple Watch, Pebble, and Jawbone UP all have activity tracking devices.  Many companies are offering incentives for employees who work on staying fit and healthy by using this wearable technology. For example, BP Oil gave employees a free Fitbit in exchange for them tracking their annual steps. Those BP employees who logged 1 million steps in a year were given lower insurance premiums. These benefits for the employee are monetary but there are other pros to consider as well. The data collected with wearable technology is very accurate and can help the user when she goes to her physician for an ailment. The doctor can look at this data and it can help connect the dots with symptoms and then assist the provider with a diagnosis.

So, what are the advantages to the company who creates wellness programs utilizing wearable technology?

·      Job seekers have said that employee wellness programs like this are very attractive to them when looking for a job.

·      Millennials are already wearing these devices and say that employers who invest in their well-being increases employee morale.

·      Employee healthcare costs are reduced.

·     Improved productivity including fewer disruptions from sick days.

The overall health and fitness of the company can be the driving force behind introducing wearable technology in a business but the benefits are so much more than that. Morale and productivity are intangible benefits but very important ones to consider. All in all, wearable technology is a great incentive for adopting healthy lifestyles and that benefits everyone—employee AND employer. 

 

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