group health plans

Short-Term Limited-Duration Insurance – In a Nutshell | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

On August 3, 2018, the Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Treasury (the Departments) published a Final Rule to expand the availability of short-term medical policies. Called short-term, limited-duration insurance (STLDI), the policies are marketed to individuals as an alternative to ACA-compliant plans. Currently a short-term policy is limited to less than three months, but the new rule will allow carriers to issue the policies for longer periods.

What is short-term limited-duration insurance (STLDI)?

Short-term, limited-duration insurance is a specific type of health coverage that is exempt from the ACA’s market reform rules. STLDI policies may exclude entire categories of benefits, such as prescription drugs, maternity, or mental health care, may impose coverage caps, and may reject applicants with pre-existing conditions. STLDI policies offer lower premiums than ACA-compliant plans because they provide less coverage and typically only accept healthy applicants.

Note that STLDI is not minimum essential coverage and does not satisfy the ACA’s individual mandate. The individual mandate (i.e., the requirement for individuals to have some form of minimum essential coverage) expires at the end of 2018, after which persons without adequate health coverage will no longer be exposed to potential IRS tax penalties.

What is the purpose of the new federal rule?

The existing rule defines “short term” as less than three months and limits the policy’s duration by prohibiting renewals that would go beyond the three-month period. The new rule, on the other hand, will allow carriers to issue STLDI policies for an initial term of up to 364 days, and allows extensions or renewals for up a total of 36 months. This is a significant change that is intended to expand access to low-cost limited-coverage options for individuals.

The new federal rule takes effect for STLDI policies issued October 2, 2018, or later. There is a catch, however. Insurance is subject to state insurance laws, and many states appear reluctant to adopt the new rule for policies issued in their state. Some states even prohibit short-term policies under the current federal rule. At last weekend’s National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) meeting, several state regulators expressed concerns about “junk insurance” or deceptive marketing practices that may lure consumers into purchasing substandard coverage.

Are employers affected by STLDI policies or the new rule?

No.

Employers are not directly affected by STLDI policies. The policies are marketed to individuals, where permitted by state insurance law; they are not group plans.

Some workers may consider STLDI options, or ACA-compliant individual insurance options, as an alternative to their employer’s group plan. In most cases, though, persons who buy individual insurance do so because they do not have access to an employer’s plan. Workers whose employment ends may also consider individual options as an alternative to COBRA.

What’s Next?

Over the coming weeks and months, state insurance regulators and state legislatures are expected to review their existing laws and regulations on short-term, limited-duration insurance and consider whether to adopt changes. Some states likely will choose to implement rules to support the new federal rule, while other states certainly will impose restrictions or continue to prohibit the sale of insurance products they consider to be substandard.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

Short Term Disability.jpg

Benefits Easy: Intro to Self-Funding | North Carolina Employee Benefits

As the first month of 2018 wraps up, companies have already begun the arduous task of submitting budgets and finding ways to cut costs for the new year. One of the most effective ways to combat increasing health care costs for companies is to move to a Self-Funded insurance plan. By paying for claims out-of-pocket instead of paying a premium to an insurance carrier, companies can save around 20% in administration costs and state taxes. That's quite a cost savings!

The topic of Self-Funding is huge and so we want to break it down into smaller bites for you to digest. This month we want to tackle a basic introduction to Self-Funding and in the coming months, we will cover the benefits, risks, and the stop-loss associated with this type of plan.

THE BASICS

·       When the employer assumes the financial risk for providing health care benefits to its employees, this is called Self-Funding.

·       Self-Funded plans allow the employer to tailor the benefits plan design to best suit their employees. Employers can look at the demographics of their workforce and decide which benefits would be most utilized as well as cut benefits that are forecasted to be underutilized.

·       While previously most used by large companies, small and mid-sized companies, even with as few as 25 employees, are seeing cost benefits to moving to Self-Funded insurance plans.

·       Companies pay no state premium taxes on self-funded expenditures. This savings is around 1.5% - 3/5% depending on in which state the company operates.

·       Since employers are paying for claims, they have access to claims data. While keeping within HIPAA privacy guidelines, the employer can identify and reach out to employees with certain at-risk conditions (diabetes, heart disease, stroke) and offer assistance with combating these health concerns. This also allows greater population-wide health intervention like weight loss programs and smoking cessation assistance.

·       Companies typically hire third-party administrators (TPA) to help design and administer the insurance plans. This allows greater control of the plan benefits and claims payments for the company.

As you can see, Self-Funding has many facets. It's important to gather as much information as you can and weigh the benefits and risks of moving from a Fully-Funded plan for your company to a Self-Funded one. Doing your research and making the move to a Self-Funded plan could help you gain greater control over your healthcare costs and allow you to design an original plan that best fits your employees.

Intro to Self Funding January 2018 (002).png

IRS Issues New Guidance on Qualified Small Employer HRAs

Can you still provide benefits without a group health plan?  Yes, you can!  Small employers who need to entice the best, most qualified employees can still have an attractive benefits package without having the stress of a high-cost health plan.  Even better news?  The way to do it is tax deductible.  Learn more about the Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangement (QSEHRA) from our compliance bulletin.  Follow us to stay up-to-date on the rules, regulations and laws that affect small employers by connecting with us on social media and signing up for our monthly newsletter.  

Want to learn more about the association health plan we are putting together?  Let's meet and talk about that.  I'm just a phone call away.

Bulletin Page 1.jpg
Bulletin Page 2.jpg
Bulletin Page 3.jpg
Bulletin Page 4.jpg