North Carolina

8 Tips for Handling Tough Employee Conversations | North Carolina Employee Benefits

We all get cold feet when it comes to addressing difficult issues with colleagues in the workplace. It’s stressful, and you just can’t help but think of all of the ways that a well-meaning conversation could go sideways. You worry about the longer-lasting effects of a damaged work relationship but know that you must correct problematic work performance or behaviors before they get out of control.

Uncomfortable conversations about personal behaviors and poor performance are tough, and putting them off just allows the problems to worsen. Use your knowledge of the situation and put together the right combination of management skills to tackle the talk now.

Imagine these all-too-familiar employee situations that you know you need to address but don’t think you have the wisdom (or can’t muster up the courage) to handle:

  • The “No Good Deed Goes Unpunished” situation. For the past several months, one of your team members has been underperforming, and it has dragged down your business unit’s productivity. The underperforming employee has shared that she has a number of family and financial issues and is trying her hardest to stay ocused on work because she needs this job and loves the company. She lives your company values and is well-liked by her co-workers. Everyone feels bad for her situation and has been picking up the slack, but they are growing resentful of the extra work with no end in sight. You’ve been trying to be kind by avoiding the issues as her performance has slid from bad to worse. It is now impacting your company’s overall performance and degrading the employee relations climate.

  • The “Bad Behavior, Great Performer” situation. One of your employees consistently exceeds his production goals at the expense of the company culture. He is highly critical of others, issues demands from other work teams without regard for their other priorities, and employees grudgingly drop everything to deliver on impossible deadlines because they believe that they cannot push back. It’s all about him and his performance. He is regularly recognized by the company leadership for being the top producer, and employee complaints to management about his behavior have not been addressed. While production goals are good, your company culture is sinking and you’re starting to see increased absenteeism and turnover among your staff.

Don’t Overlook the Signals

In addition to employee resentment and lost productivity, there’s a bottom-line impact for not tackling these tough talks at the right time and in the right manner. The key is to pay attention to the signals and not feed the problem with neglect.

In the first scenario, trying to be a kind and sensitive boss worked in the beginning but is now backfiring. At first the team worked together to help their struggling colleague, but without a plan to fix the problem in the longer term, it created three serious issues for you to fix: employee morale, lack of confidence in your leadership for missing the signals of “team fatigue,” and not having a plan to keep the team on track — all resulting in lost productivity.

The best thing you can do in situations like these is to work with the struggling employee to develop a plan that puts her back on track or helps her consider alternatives if necessary. This type of conversation requires sensitivity along with some firmness because you need to steer the conversation from the personal issues back to actionable work deliverables.

In my experience dealing with circumstances like the second scenario, typically management allows the top performer’s behavior to go unchecked for fear that if the employee is corrected his performance will suffer or he will quit the company. While there may be an element of truth to those concerns if the individual is unwilling to accept constructive feedback, the bigger fear should be for the company’s culture, employee erosion of trust and confidence in the leadership team, and the motivation, performance, and retention of the other company employees if the behavior is not changed.

Often the top performer continues to use the same work patterns that have been successful and isn’t even aware of the impact on others. Addressing the issues sensitively so that he can make personal changes has the potential to create even higher levels of team unity and performance.

What Signals are You Looking For?

For starters, watch your team’s interactions with each other, be sure that each team member understands their key performance objectives, and take the time to “check in” regularly and solicit feedback about the job, work team, and overall company with each employee.

Having direct conversations on a regular basis helps you nip problems in the bud and shows your employees that you care about their concerns. You also learn each other’s communication patterns so that when it comes time to have that awkward or difficult conversation, you both are less uncomfortable.

Groups where team members work remotely increase the chances that signals can be missed. When telecommuting is coupled with the use of instant messaging and other forms of communications in place of direct face-to-face or voice communications, the sender’s well-intentioned messages may get lost in translation. Be sure to follow up any electronic communications with a direct phone call or meeting.

Eight Tips for Tackling These Conversations

Strategies to manage conflicts with subordinates are not fully taught in business classes. More common are courses addressing project conflicts, where the focus is on fixing the “what” of the problem, such as resetting priorities, changing business plans, or repairing broken systems or processes. There are fewer tools focusing on how teams communicate and repairing broken business relationships. Preparation and planning are critical to get what you need from these hard conversations while keeping your relationship with the employee intact.

  1. Focus your own viewpoint first. If you start out thinking the conversation will be really hard, you’re going to be more anxious. Chances are the conversation will be harder. Instead, position this discussion as a means to enhance your relationship while helping your employee develop better skills, understand company priorities better, or work more positively on the team. Think about how you can deliver the difficult talking points with honesty, courage and fairness.

  2. Recognize the emotions you will be feeling. Are you disappointed in this employee? Angry about the problems they’ve caused? Scared that your conversation will damage your work relationship? Put your negative feelings aside and consider how you will frame the problem you need to discuss and how your employee may feel. Try to come at the discussion with consideration and compassion for their feelings and frame the conversation with a desire for the employee’s success. “John, we need to have a hard conversation today, and I’m feeling anxious because I want you to win. Please know that I am invested in your success and will work with you to make that happen.”

  3. Be intentional in planning the conversation, but don’t script it out so that your delivery sounds mechanical. Some business consultants suggest drafting a script and considering alternatives based on the employee’s reactions. In my experience, these conversations never go completely according to plan, and scripted conversations feel artificial. Instead, write down key points and plan as if you are just having a simple conversation with a colleague. Be prepared to provide specifics and pace your conversation so that you take time to gauge your employee’s reactions to your comments. Your employee may react defensively if you provide vague statements. Instead of saying, “Sue, people in the company are telling me that you are difficult to work with and have a bad attitude,” frame the issue with examples, such as, “Sue, I am concerned because I’ve noticed in the last four team meetings you arrived late and weren’t prepared with project updates. As a result, both Joe and Sam missed their deliverables, and you didn’t let any of us know in advance that the timeline was slipping.”

  4. Recognize that you own part of the problem, too. Your goal is to have a conversation between adults where each owns some responsibility for the issue and solving the problem. This takes the conversation from finding fault to finding solutions. “Rob, I realize now that you have too many priorities and I didn’t provide you with the resources to deliver on the project. I also realize that I avoided addressing the problem at the beginning of the project and let it go too long without discussing it with you.”

  5. Outline what you want changed. Don’t just discuss the problem; describe the end result you envision. Discuss realistic and achievable outcomes and be willing to offer resources and assistance as appropriate.

  6. Ask the employee for his or her viewpoints. The last thing you want is a one-sided conversation. Slow the pace of the conversation, observe the employee’s reactions to your comments, and ask for feedback and suggestions for solving the problem. You may learn new information about what may have caused the problem, and the employee could offer even better solutions than you thought possible. Throughout the conversation, look for areas of consensus and acknowledge the employee’s feelings and concerns. That shows respect.

  7. End the conversation on a positive note with an action plan. Thank the employee for working with you through the difficult discussion. Acknowledge that it was a tough conversation and express appreciation for the employee’s professionalism as you both work towards a better outcome. Develop a going-forward action plan to solve the problem. “Tom, this was a hard talk, and I know it wasn’t easy for you. You provided some good ideas for fixing the issue, and I appreciate your professionalism. You can do this, and I am here to help you win.”

  8. Close the loop and follow up. Give the employee a little time to reflect on the discussion, but no more than a day or two. Follow up and ask the employee if they would like to have another discussion to cover any additional information or clarification. Put the agreed-upon action plan in writing, schedule regular status meetings, and recognize progress and improved performance. Taking these steps demonstrates your respect for the employee and desire for them to succeed.

Keep the Conversation Going

Great managers keep the conversation going to ensure team members are aligned and supporting each other to create a healthy corporate culture and successful company. When problems arise, they have the tough conversations to get things back on track. Handling these discussions well takes courage as well as empathetic listening and communications skills. Pay attention to the signals, develop your communications plan, and you’ll be more confident in tackling your next tough employee communications challenge.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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Ask the Experts: FSA Limits | North Carolina Employee Benefits

Question: Our company offers flexible spending accounts (FSAs) for health care and dependent daycare. Our plan limits are the maximum amounts allowed by federal law. Will the IRS increase the limits for 2019? We hold open enrollment in November for employees to make their FSA elections for the following year.

Answer: The maximum annual limits for Dependent Care FSAs and Health Care FSAs are set forth under § 129 and § 125, respectively, of the Internal Revenue Code.

The § 129 (Dependent Care) limits do not change from year to year. They are currently $5,000, or $2,500 if married and filing separately, and they apply on a calendar-year basis. To change them would require a change in law, which is unlikely in the current Congress.

On the other hand, the maximum limit for elective contributions to a Health Care FSA (HFSA) may change from year to year depending on inflation. The limit applies on a plan-year basis and the HFSA limit for a 12-month plan year beginning in 2018 is $2,650. The limit is one of over 50 different tax provisions that is subject to annual cost-of-living or inflation adjustments. Each fall, the IRS announces any changes for the following year. The announcement usually is released in mid-October, which should give employers time to prepare 2019 enrollment materials.

Based on estimated inflation, it appears the HFSA limit will increase from $2,650 for plan years beginning in 2018 to $2,700 for plan years beginning in 2019. The increase will not be official, however, until the IRS announcement is released.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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New Federal Contract Compliance Directives | North Carolina Employee Benefits

On August 24, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) announced the following three directives:

  • Guidance for Contractor Compensation PracticesDirective 2018-05 clarifies the OFCCP’s approach to conducting compensation evaluations, supports compliance and compensation self-analyses by contractors, and improves compensation analysis consistency and efficiency during compliance evaluations.
  • Contractor Recognition Programs: Directive 2018-06 establishes a contractor recognition program with awards that highlight best practices, a contractor mentoring program, and other initiatives that provide opportunities for contractors to collaborate or provide feedback to OFCCP.
  • Affirmative Action Program Verification Initiative: Federal contractors are legally required to take steps to ensure equal opportunity in their employment processes, including developing a written affirmative action program within 120 days of when the contract begins. Directive 2018-07 establishes a program for verifying compliance with these and other affirmative action obligations.

The OFCCP enforces federal laws that prohibit federal contractors and subcontractors from discriminating on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, or status as a protected veteran. In addition, contractors and subcontractors are prohibited from discriminating against applicants or employees because they inquire about, discuss, or disclose their compensation or that of others, subject to certain limitations.

Originally published www.thinkhr.com

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Short-Term Limited-Duration Insurance – In a Nutshell | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

On August 3, 2018, the Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Treasury (the Departments) published a Final Rule to expand the availability of short-term medical policies. Called short-term, limited-duration insurance (STLDI), the policies are marketed to individuals as an alternative to ACA-compliant plans. Currently a short-term policy is limited to less than three months, but the new rule will allow carriers to issue the policies for longer periods.

What is short-term limited-duration insurance (STLDI)?

Short-term, limited-duration insurance is a specific type of health coverage that is exempt from the ACA’s market reform rules. STLDI policies may exclude entire categories of benefits, such as prescription drugs, maternity, or mental health care, may impose coverage caps, and may reject applicants with pre-existing conditions. STLDI policies offer lower premiums than ACA-compliant plans because they provide less coverage and typically only accept healthy applicants.

Note that STLDI is not minimum essential coverage and does not satisfy the ACA’s individual mandate. The individual mandate (i.e., the requirement for individuals to have some form of minimum essential coverage) expires at the end of 2018, after which persons without adequate health coverage will no longer be exposed to potential IRS tax penalties.

What is the purpose of the new federal rule?

The existing rule defines “short term” as less than three months and limits the policy’s duration by prohibiting renewals that would go beyond the three-month period. The new rule, on the other hand, will allow carriers to issue STLDI policies for an initial term of up to 364 days, and allows extensions or renewals for up a total of 36 months. This is a significant change that is intended to expand access to low-cost limited-coverage options for individuals.

The new federal rule takes effect for STLDI policies issued October 2, 2018, or later. There is a catch, however. Insurance is subject to state insurance laws, and many states appear reluctant to adopt the new rule for policies issued in their state. Some states even prohibit short-term policies under the current federal rule. At last weekend’s National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) meeting, several state regulators expressed concerns about “junk insurance” or deceptive marketing practices that may lure consumers into purchasing substandard coverage.

Are employers affected by STLDI policies or the new rule?

No.

Employers are not directly affected by STLDI policies. The policies are marketed to individuals, where permitted by state insurance law; they are not group plans.

Some workers may consider STLDI options, or ACA-compliant individual insurance options, as an alternative to their employer’s group plan. In most cases, though, persons who buy individual insurance do so because they do not have access to an employer’s plan. Workers whose employment ends may also consider individual options as an alternative to COBRA.

What’s Next?

Over the coming weeks and months, state insurance regulators and state legislatures are expected to review their existing laws and regulations on short-term, limited-duration insurance and consider whether to adopt changes. Some states likely will choose to implement rules to support the new federal rule, while other states certainly will impose restrictions or continue to prohibit the sale of insurance products they consider to be substandard.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

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