employees

8 Tips for Handling Tough Employee Conversations | North Carolina Employee Benefits

We all get cold feet when it comes to addressing difficult issues with colleagues in the workplace. It’s stressful, and you just can’t help but think of all of the ways that a well-meaning conversation could go sideways. You worry about the longer-lasting effects of a damaged work relationship but know that you must correct problematic work performance or behaviors before they get out of control.

Uncomfortable conversations about personal behaviors and poor performance are tough, and putting them off just allows the problems to worsen. Use your knowledge of the situation and put together the right combination of management skills to tackle the talk now.

Imagine these all-too-familiar employee situations that you know you need to address but don’t think you have the wisdom (or can’t muster up the courage) to handle:

  • The “No Good Deed Goes Unpunished” situation. For the past several months, one of your team members has been underperforming, and it has dragged down your business unit’s productivity. The underperforming employee has shared that she has a number of family and financial issues and is trying her hardest to stay ocused on work because she needs this job and loves the company. She lives your company values and is well-liked by her co-workers. Everyone feels bad for her situation and has been picking up the slack, but they are growing resentful of the extra work with no end in sight. You’ve been trying to be kind by avoiding the issues as her performance has slid from bad to worse. It is now impacting your company’s overall performance and degrading the employee relations climate.

  • The “Bad Behavior, Great Performer” situation. One of your employees consistently exceeds his production goals at the expense of the company culture. He is highly critical of others, issues demands from other work teams without regard for their other priorities, and employees grudgingly drop everything to deliver on impossible deadlines because they believe that they cannot push back. It’s all about him and his performance. He is regularly recognized by the company leadership for being the top producer, and employee complaints to management about his behavior have not been addressed. While production goals are good, your company culture is sinking and you’re starting to see increased absenteeism and turnover among your staff.

Don’t Overlook the Signals

In addition to employee resentment and lost productivity, there’s a bottom-line impact for not tackling these tough talks at the right time and in the right manner. The key is to pay attention to the signals and not feed the problem with neglect.

In the first scenario, trying to be a kind and sensitive boss worked in the beginning but is now backfiring. At first the team worked together to help their struggling colleague, but without a plan to fix the problem in the longer term, it created three serious issues for you to fix: employee morale, lack of confidence in your leadership for missing the signals of “team fatigue,” and not having a plan to keep the team on track — all resulting in lost productivity.

The best thing you can do in situations like these is to work with the struggling employee to develop a plan that puts her back on track or helps her consider alternatives if necessary. This type of conversation requires sensitivity along with some firmness because you need to steer the conversation from the personal issues back to actionable work deliverables.

In my experience dealing with circumstances like the second scenario, typically management allows the top performer’s behavior to go unchecked for fear that if the employee is corrected his performance will suffer or he will quit the company. While there may be an element of truth to those concerns if the individual is unwilling to accept constructive feedback, the bigger fear should be for the company’s culture, employee erosion of trust and confidence in the leadership team, and the motivation, performance, and retention of the other company employees if the behavior is not changed.

Often the top performer continues to use the same work patterns that have been successful and isn’t even aware of the impact on others. Addressing the issues sensitively so that he can make personal changes has the potential to create even higher levels of team unity and performance.

What Signals are You Looking For?

For starters, watch your team’s interactions with each other, be sure that each team member understands their key performance objectives, and take the time to “check in” regularly and solicit feedback about the job, work team, and overall company with each employee.

Having direct conversations on a regular basis helps you nip problems in the bud and shows your employees that you care about their concerns. You also learn each other’s communication patterns so that when it comes time to have that awkward or difficult conversation, you both are less uncomfortable.

Groups where team members work remotely increase the chances that signals can be missed. When telecommuting is coupled with the use of instant messaging and other forms of communications in place of direct face-to-face or voice communications, the sender’s well-intentioned messages may get lost in translation. Be sure to follow up any electronic communications with a direct phone call or meeting.

Eight Tips for Tackling These Conversations

Strategies to manage conflicts with subordinates are not fully taught in business classes. More common are courses addressing project conflicts, where the focus is on fixing the “what” of the problem, such as resetting priorities, changing business plans, or repairing broken systems or processes. There are fewer tools focusing on how teams communicate and repairing broken business relationships. Preparation and planning are critical to get what you need from these hard conversations while keeping your relationship with the employee intact.

  1. Focus your own viewpoint first. If you start out thinking the conversation will be really hard, you’re going to be more anxious. Chances are the conversation will be harder. Instead, position this discussion as a means to enhance your relationship while helping your employee develop better skills, understand company priorities better, or work more positively on the team. Think about how you can deliver the difficult talking points with honesty, courage and fairness.

  2. Recognize the emotions you will be feeling. Are you disappointed in this employee? Angry about the problems they’ve caused? Scared that your conversation will damage your work relationship? Put your negative feelings aside and consider how you will frame the problem you need to discuss and how your employee may feel. Try to come at the discussion with consideration and compassion for their feelings and frame the conversation with a desire for the employee’s success. “John, we need to have a hard conversation today, and I’m feeling anxious because I want you to win. Please know that I am invested in your success and will work with you to make that happen.”

  3. Be intentional in planning the conversation, but don’t script it out so that your delivery sounds mechanical. Some business consultants suggest drafting a script and considering alternatives based on the employee’s reactions. In my experience, these conversations never go completely according to plan, and scripted conversations feel artificial. Instead, write down key points and plan as if you are just having a simple conversation with a colleague. Be prepared to provide specifics and pace your conversation so that you take time to gauge your employee’s reactions to your comments. Your employee may react defensively if you provide vague statements. Instead of saying, “Sue, people in the company are telling me that you are difficult to work with and have a bad attitude,” frame the issue with examples, such as, “Sue, I am concerned because I’ve noticed in the last four team meetings you arrived late and weren’t prepared with project updates. As a result, both Joe and Sam missed their deliverables, and you didn’t let any of us know in advance that the timeline was slipping.”

  4. Recognize that you own part of the problem, too. Your goal is to have a conversation between adults where each owns some responsibility for the issue and solving the problem. This takes the conversation from finding fault to finding solutions. “Rob, I realize now that you have too many priorities and I didn’t provide you with the resources to deliver on the project. I also realize that I avoided addressing the problem at the beginning of the project and let it go too long without discussing it with you.”

  5. Outline what you want changed. Don’t just discuss the problem; describe the end result you envision. Discuss realistic and achievable outcomes and be willing to offer resources and assistance as appropriate.

  6. Ask the employee for his or her viewpoints. The last thing you want is a one-sided conversation. Slow the pace of the conversation, observe the employee’s reactions to your comments, and ask for feedback and suggestions for solving the problem. You may learn new information about what may have caused the problem, and the employee could offer even better solutions than you thought possible. Throughout the conversation, look for areas of consensus and acknowledge the employee’s feelings and concerns. That shows respect.

  7. End the conversation on a positive note with an action plan. Thank the employee for working with you through the difficult discussion. Acknowledge that it was a tough conversation and express appreciation for the employee’s professionalism as you both work towards a better outcome. Develop a going-forward action plan to solve the problem. “Tom, this was a hard talk, and I know it wasn’t easy for you. You provided some good ideas for fixing the issue, and I appreciate your professionalism. You can do this, and I am here to help you win.”

  8. Close the loop and follow up. Give the employee a little time to reflect on the discussion, but no more than a day or two. Follow up and ask the employee if they would like to have another discussion to cover any additional information or clarification. Put the agreed-upon action plan in writing, schedule regular status meetings, and recognize progress and improved performance. Taking these steps demonstrates your respect for the employee and desire for them to succeed.

Keep the Conversation Going

Great managers keep the conversation going to ensure team members are aligned and supporting each other to create a healthy corporate culture and successful company. When problems arise, they have the tough conversations to get things back on track. Handling these discussions well takes courage as well as empathetic listening and communications skills. Pay attention to the signals, develop your communications plan, and you’ll be more confident in tackling your next tough employee communications challenge.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

Tough Employee Conversations.jpg

Ask the Experts: FSA Limits | North Carolina Employee Benefits

Question: Our company offers flexible spending accounts (FSAs) for health care and dependent daycare. Our plan limits are the maximum amounts allowed by federal law. Will the IRS increase the limits for 2019? We hold open enrollment in November for employees to make their FSA elections for the following year.

Answer: The maximum annual limits for Dependent Care FSAs and Health Care FSAs are set forth under § 129 and § 125, respectively, of the Internal Revenue Code.

The § 129 (Dependent Care) limits do not change from year to year. They are currently $5,000, or $2,500 if married and filing separately, and they apply on a calendar-year basis. To change them would require a change in law, which is unlikely in the current Congress.

On the other hand, the maximum limit for elective contributions to a Health Care FSA (HFSA) may change from year to year depending on inflation. The limit applies on a plan-year basis and the HFSA limit for a 12-month plan year beginning in 2018 is $2,650. The limit is one of over 50 different tax provisions that is subject to annual cost-of-living or inflation adjustments. Each fall, the IRS announces any changes for the following year. The announcement usually is released in mid-October, which should give employers time to prepare 2019 enrollment materials.

Based on estimated inflation, it appears the HFSA limit will increase from $2,650 for plan years beginning in 2018 to $2,700 for plan years beginning in 2019. The increase will not be official, however, until the IRS announcement is released.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

FSA-FMLA-1-694x240.jpg

Preparation Aids Prevention | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

Incidences of workplace violence are becoming more common and are all over the news. It’s not just high-profile headline cases that are a concern—it’s happening on a smaller scale in all kinds of businesses. Threats to workplaces can take many forms, from cyberbullying and workplace harassment to physical altercations and targeted violence.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that every year nearly 2 million U.S. workers are victims of workplace violence, with a total economic cost of more than $55 billion. According to the most recent National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, violence in the workplace increased 23 percent between 2015 and 2016 to become the second-most common category of workplace fatalities, behind transportation incidents.

Assessing elements of risk that may trigger violence, along with developing a prevention plan, is critical.

While a bill has been recently introduced in Congress relating to workplace violence in the healthcare industry, and some states address workplace violence in their safety regulations, there are no specific OSHA standards for workplace violence at the federal level outside of the OSHA General Duty Clause. This clause requires employers to provide their employees with a place of employment that is “free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious harm.”

If your clients experience acts of workplace violence or become aware of threats, intimidation, or other indicators suggesting that the potential for violence in the workplace exists, OSHA and state programs would expect them to implement a workplace violence prevention program combined with controls and training.

The good news is, you can help arm your clients with strategies for reducing the risk of workplace violence this summer.

Prevention is key

Assessing elements of risk that may trigger violence, along with developing a prevention plan, is critical. This starts with a complete evaluation of the organization’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats as they relate to the types of risks the organization might face. A review of the company’s strategic objectives and deliverables, the resources available to employees to accomplish these deliverables, and the physical layout of the facility are important elements to include in this evaluation.

Workplace violence preparation and prevention strategies

Hire right. Your clients’ businesses may be at risk due to the actions of their employees. Advise them to make good hiring decisions by clearly defining job requirements and thoroughly evaluating applicants. They should look carefully at resumes and job applications, probe gaps in applicants’ work histories, and verify education and work experience. Encourage them to conduct reference and background checks and be consistent with all applicants throughout the hiring process. That way, they can potentially avoid bad hires or negligent hiring claims.

Set clear expectations. When employees know what is expected of them, including behaviors important to the organization and performance standards, and those expectations are consistently enforced, they may experience less work-related stress and anxiety that can lead to hostility and violent outbursts.

Nurture an inclusive company culture. Studies show that in companies where employees feel like they are a part of the business and understand how their work contributes to the organization’s success, employees are more engaged and have more trust in their leaders and co-workers. Encourage your clients to focus on an inclusive culture built on strong values and it might result in fewer accidents, less absenteeism, and reduced risk for EPLI claims or workplace violence incidents.

Establish emergency preparedness plans. Advise your clients to develop emergency plans covering human-caused emergencies such as crime and violence, as well as hazards caused by natural disasters, outbreaks of disease, and accidents.

Establish safe reporting systems. Recommend that clients establish more than one method for employees to report any type of threat or issue that makes them feel unsafe in the workplace. These systems should include clear communication to employees that everyone is responsible for workplace safety, and there will be no retaliation for reporting safety concerns.

Provide workplace wellness programs. Some safety experts suggest that companies that demonstrate their commitment to their employees’ wellbeing through comprehensive wellness programs may reduce the risk of workplace violence. The rationale is that these programs help to defuse employee stress, anxiety, and unhealthy personal behaviors that can lead to violence.

Train, train, train. Every member of the team should be trained to know what to do in each type of emergency. In the case of workplace violence prevention, encourage your clients to train employees who have contact with the public about how to defuse potentially violent situations and protect themselves. Designate management team members to receive additional training to recognize the signs of employee distress — such as physical exhaustion, missing work commitments, more time out of the office, violent outbursts, isolating themselves from co-workers, or talking about hurting themselves or others — with the proper procedures for handling those situations. Well-trained team members who react quickly can save lives.

With the proper planning, systems, communications, and training, your clients can be better prepared to prevent or lessen the threats of workplace violence.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

Workplace Violence ThinkHr.jpg

10 Stories That Caught Our Eye in June 2018 | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

Just Don’t Ask

Job candidates are covered by the Civil Rights Act prohibiting discrimination, and most interviewers know what kinds of direct questions to avoid. But what seems like a friendly conversation-starter could be an unwitting violation of the act. Read five questions you should never ask.

Read more on Namely.

Trust in Design

Office design is known to have an impact on employee productivity and satisfaction. At the heart of this is trust – trust that staff will choose to use the facility in the most effective way rather than be chained to their desks. And when trust rises, engagement follows.

Read more on Entrepreneur.

Pride Without Pandering

June was Pride Month, and corporations everywhere joined in the celebration. Some, although well-meaning, missed the mark. Seven LGBTQ executives explain how employers can embrace inclusion and celebrate diversity without coming across as pandering.

Read more on Fast Company.

Dad Days

Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian was a proponent of paternity leave and planned to lead by example by using his company’s benefit. However, he didn’t fully appreciate its importance until his daughter was born and he used the time off to slow down and take stock of his priorities.

Read more on CNN.

Culture Still Eats Strategy

Strategy is essential, but if a company doesn’t have a good culture, it won’t matter. Once you understand what culture is and isn’t, you can work toward developing a strong one, starting with defining the qualities you value in your employees.

Read more on Forbes.

Buy in Bulk

A rule released by the U.S. Department of Labor on June 19 loosens restrictions on association health plans, paving the way for more small businesses to band together to buy health coverage. That is, if it stands up to legal challenges, state laws, and the realities of the insurance marketplace.

Read more on Kaiser Health News.

The Family Friendly Workplace

Work-life balance can be especially challenging for parents. Both mothers and fathers lament not having enough time for their children. Get 10 creative ways you can make your workplace better for working parents.

Read more on Employee Benefit News.

Remote Control

The remote workforce continues to grow, but 57 percent of companies still lack a remote work policy. These companies may be missing out on attracting and retaining top talent. There’s no one-size-fits-all solution, with numerous factors to consider in crafting one.

Read more on HR Dive.

What Makes a Great Workplace

Inc. magazine surveyed thousands of employees to measure what employer qualities lead to high levels of employee engagement and sentiment, taking into account elements of corporate culture. See which of 45 perks and benefits employees value most.

Read more on Inc.

Run, Hide, Fight

Law enforcement officials stress the need for employers to conduct active shooter training to protect their employees and customers in the event of a violent incident. In addition to training, find out other ways to mitigate the risk a shooter or potential shooter holds.

Read more on Business Insurance.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

ThinkHR 10 Stories.jpg

6 Questions on Dependent Care Spending Accounts | North Carolina Employee Benefits

School’s out! Summer is here, and it’s the time of year when working parents have questions about using their Dependent Care Spending Accounts (DCSAs). Are summer camp expenses eligible? What about day versus overnight camps? Employers and benefit advisors want to be ready with answers about this valuable benefit program.

The following are the top summertime questions about DCSAs and reimbursable expenses:

1. What are the basic rules for reimbursable expenses?

Dependent care expenses, such as babysitting and daycare center costs, must be work-related to qualify for reimbursement. Work-related means the expenses are for the care of the employee’s child under age 13 to allow the employee to work. If the employee is married and filing jointly, the employee’s spouse also must be gainfully employed or looking for work (unless disabled or a full-time student).

In some cases, expenses to care for a disabled dependent, regardless of age, may be reimbursable. This article focuses on expenses for children under 13 since those are by far the most common type of DCSA reimbursement.

2. One of our employees and his family are taking a two-week vacation this summer, but his children’s daycare center will charge its regular fee. Are the expenses reimbursable even if the employee and spouse are off work?

Yes. In most cases, expenses are not eligible unless the dependent care services are necessary for the parents to work, but some exceptions apply. The IRS rules for DCSAs provide that expenses during short, temporary absences are eligible if the employee has to pay the child’s care provider. Absences of up to two weeks are automatically considered short, temporary absences. Depending on the circumstances, longer absences also may qualify.

3. During the school year, our employee uses her DCSA for her 10-year old’s after-school daycare center expenses. This summer, the child’s daycare will be provided by her 20-year old sister. If the older daughter bills for her services, are the costs eligible for reimbursement?

The answer depends on whether the employee or spouse can claim the older daughter as a tax dependent. If the older daughter can be claimed as a dependent, whether or not the employee actually claims her, she is not a qualifying dependent care provider under the DCSA rules.

If the older daughter cannot be claimed as a tax dependent, her charges for providing care are eligible expenses. The specific rule is that a child of the employee, whom the employee cannot claim as a dependent, may be a qualifying provider if the child is age 19 or older by the end of the year.

Note that the employee’s spouse or the child’s parent is never a qualifying provider.

4. One of our employees has to pay an application fee and deposit before her child starts attending a daycare center this summer. Are those expenses eligible for reimbursement?

Prepaid expenses are eligible for DCSA reimbursement, provided the costs are required in order for the child to receive care. In this case, after the daycare center begins providing care, the employee can be reimbursed for the application fee and deposit she paid. On the other hand, if the employee cancels and her child does not attend, then the application fee and deposit are not eligible expenses.

5. An employee will pay day camp expenses for his 8-year-old son and overnight camp expenses for his 12-year-old daughter this summer. Are both types of expenses eligible for reimbursement?

The day camp expenses generally are reimbursable. Expenses for overnight camp, however, are not eligible since overnight care is not work-related.

Under the IRS rules for DCSAs, expenses for food, lodging, clothing, education, and entertainment are not reimbursable. If, however, such expenses are small, incidental expenses that cannot be separated from the cost of caring for the child, they may be included for reimbursement. For instance, the day camp may include lunch, snacks, and some sports activities in its basic fee, which would be eligible for reimbursement.

6. An employee’s children go to private year-round schools. He pays tuition for one child’s grade school and fees for the other child’s nursery school. Are both types of expenses eligible for reimbursement?

Educational expenses are not reimbursable, unless the educational services are merely incidental as part of a child care service. Expenses to attend kindergarten or a higher grade are educational, so the older child’s school fees are not eligible for DCSA reimbursement. (Expenses for before- or after-school care, however, may qualify as reimbursable expenses.)

On the other hand, expenses for a child in nursery school, preschool, or a similar program for children below the level of kindergarten are expenses for care. Such expenses are not considered educational even though the nursery school may include some educational activities.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

happy-school-children-playing-tug-of-war-with-PWAZQT9-694x240.jpg

Disability Insurance and why you need it! | North Carolina Employee Benefits

“Your most valued asset isn’t your house, car, or retirement account. It’s the ability to make a living.”

No one foresees needing disability benefits.  But, should a problem arise, the educated and informed employee can plan for the future by purchasing disability insurance to help cover expenses when needed.

When you ask people what is the number one reason disability insurance is needed, most will answer that it is for workplace related injuries. However, the leading causes of long-term absences are back injuries, cancer, and heart disease and most of them are NOT work related.   In addition, the average duration of absences due to disability is 34 months.  So how do you prepare for an unplanned absence from work as a result of an injury or illness? Disability insurance is a great option.

Disability insurance is categorized into two main types.

Short Term Disability covers 40-60% of the employee’s base salary and can last for a few weeks to a few months to a year. There is typically a short waiting period before benefits begin after the report of disability.  This plan is generally sponsored by the employer.

Long Term Disability covers 50-70% of the employee’s base salary and the benefits end when the disability ends or after a pre-set length of time depending on the policy. The wait period for benefits is longer—typically 90 days from onset of disability.  This plan kicks in after the short-term coverage is exhausted. The individual purchases this plan to prevent a loss of coverage after short-term disability benefits are exhausted.

While the benefits of these disability plans are not a total replacement of salary, they are designed for the employee to maintain their current standard of living while recovering from the injury or illness. This also allows the individual to pay regular expenses during this time.

There are many ways to enroll in a disability insurance plan. Often times your employer will offer long-term and short-term coverage as part of a benefits package. Supplemental coverage can also be purchased.  Talk with your company’s HR department for more information on how to enroll in these plans.  Individuals who are interested in purchasing supplemental coverage can also contact outside insurance brokers or even check with any professional organizations to which they belong (such as the American Medical Association for medical professionals) as many times they offer insurance coverage to members.

As you begin planning for your future, make sure you research the types of coverage available and different avenues through which to purchase this coverage. For more information on disability and the workplace, check out:

·      Americans with Disabilities Act

·      The National Organization on Disability

·      Council for Disability Awareness

·      Social Security Administration

Disability Insurance infographic.png

A DOL Audit Can Happen to You | North Carolina Benefit Advisors

Summary plan descriptions (SPDs) are required for all retirement, health, and welfare plans subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). However, misconceptions about this requirement are widespread. ERISA attorney Stacy H. Barrow, partner with Marathas Barrow Weatherhead Lent LLP, had a chat with ThinkHR about the importance of having proper ERISA documentation and the consequences of failing to do so.

THR: What types of employers need to have an SPD?

SHB: We tell all employers — of any size — who offer plans subject to ERISA that they need to have an SPD. This is the first item in every Department of Labor (DOL) audit. If you don’t have one and you get audited or a participant asks for plan documents, you will be scrambling to put documents together and you can’t do them fast enough to avoid an issue. In addition, cafeteria plans can only be adopted prospectively, so if you don’t have a written cafeteria plan in place, you may be jeopardizing the tax qualified status of your plan.

THR: Won’t my broker or carrier take care of these documents?

SHB: Employers may think that brokers or carriers take care of all required benefits documentation, but at the end of the day, it’s the employer who is responsible for complying with ERISA’s SPD requirement. Your broker may help you, but they might not be aware of every benefit you offer or your eligibility guidelines. The carrier’s documentation often is missing some of the required language, which is why you use a wrap. You don’t specifically have to use a wrap to develop your SPD, but the carrier document won’t get you there and an wrap is often the best way to comply. If the plan documents aren’t compliant, that’s not the carrier’s or broker’s responsibility, it’s the employer’s.

THR: Do I really need to be concerned about a DOL audit?

SHB: Employers can get complacent about documentation, thinking that only large employers get audited, or it won’t happen to them. It’s not only the large corporations that get audited. It can happen to employers of any size or type. It’s important to make sure you have good benefits documentation, because if you don’t, and you do get audited, it might cause the DOL to dig deeper and look for other problems, such as looking into your 401(k) plan.

Plan documentation is a huge part of every DOL audit. I can’t stress strongly enough that they will want to see the summary plan description and plan documents. If you can get good, compliant documents to the DOL, it increases the chances of a speedy resolution. If you can provide them quickly, it sends a message that you are ready and in compliance.

THR: What are the consequences of being out of compliance?

SHB: Not having the proper documents may be an issue if you get audited or there is litigation over a denied claim. You need to be prepared for this possibility. If the DOL audits and imposes penalties, it may not be because the employer didn’t have a wrap document, but rather because the document wasn’t updated, wasn’t compliant, or wasn’t distributed to employees. And the DOL may impose penalties of up to $152 per day for failure to provide an SPD upon request. Also, failure to inform participants of plan changes may invalidate those changes.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

 

DOL can audit you.jpg

6 Ways to Keep the Flu from Sidelining Your Workplace North Carolina Benefit Advisors

This year’s flu season is a rough one. Although the predominant strains of this year’s influenza viruses were represented in the vaccine, they mutated, which decreased the effectiveness of the immunization. The flu then spread widely and quickly, and in addition, the symptoms were severe and deadly. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that the 2017 – 2018 flu season established new records for the percentage of outpatient visits related to flu symptoms and number of flu hospitalizations.

Younger, healthy adults were hit harder than is typical, which had impacts on the workplace. In fact, Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. recently revised its estimates on the impact of this flu season on employers, raising the cost of lost productivity to over $21 billion, with roughly 25 million workers falling ill.

Fortunately, the CDC is reporting that it looks like this season is starting to peak, and while rates of infection are still high in most of the country, they are no longer rising and should start to drop. What can you do as an employer to keep your business running smoothly for the rest of this flu season and throughout the next one?

  1. Help sick employees stay home. Consider that sick employees worried about their pay, unfinished projects and deadlines, or compliance with the company attendance policy may feel they need to come to work even if they are sick. Do what you can to be compassionate and encourage them to stay home so they can get better as well as protect their co-workers from infection. In addition, make sure your sick leave policies are compliant with all local and state laws, and communicate them to your employees. Be clear with the expectation that sick employees not to report to work. For employees who feel well enough to work but may still be contagious, encourage them to work remotely if their job duties will allow. Be consistent in your application of your attendance and remote work rules.
  2. Know the law. Although the flu is generally not serious enough to require leaves of absence beyond what sick leave or PTO allow for, in a severe season, employees may need additional time off. Consider how the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), state leave laws, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) may come into play for employees who have severe cases of the flu, complications, or family members who need care.
  3. Be flexible. During acute flu outbreaks, schools or daycare facilities may close, leaving parents without childcare. Employees may also need to be away from the workplace to provide care to sick children, partners, or parents. Examine your policies to see where you can provide flexibility. Look for opportunities to cross-train employees on each other’s essential duties so their work can continue while they are out.
  4. Keep it clean. Direct cleaning crews to thoroughly disinfect high-touch areas such as doorknobs, kitchen areas, and bathrooms nightly. Provide hand sanitizer in common areas and encourage frequent handwashing. Keep disinfecting wipes handy for staff to clean their personal work areas with.
  5. Limit exposure. Avoid non-essential in-person meetings and travel that can expose employees to the flu virus. Rely on technology such as video conferencing, Slack, Skype, or other platforms to bring people together virtually. Consider staggering work shifts if possible to limit the number of people in the workplace at one time.
  6. Focus on wellness. Offer free or low-cost flu shots in the workplace. If your company provides snacks or meals for employees, offer healthier options packed with nutrients.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

woman-with-tea-in-hands-PPNNSA2_edited-694x240.jpg

Custom Benefits Solutions Expands Services

Custom Benefits Solutions Expands Services

With the desperate need to control healthcare costs, employers are eager to have a solution that allows them the advantage of large numbers but the autonomy to create their own destiny.  The current constraints and opaque pricing models of the provider-payer relationship as well as “secret” PPO contracts have yielded a healthcare system that is confusing, hard to navigate and, in some situations, bankrupting to healthcare consumers. These days it takes an employee benefits consultant who understands how to think around problems before they ever really become problems.

Employers are Calling for Innovative Solutions

Employers are Calling for Innovative Solutions

Perhaps the most notable change in this movement toward self-funding is the number of smaller employers getting in the game. Although most of these are level-funded arrangements, employers see the value in gaining control of their plan with a focus on what’s important to their specific employee base. Plus, the tax advantage isn’t bad either, as state taxes are eliminated on most self-insured plans. 

Winning the War on Diabetes

Winning the War on Diabetes

Diabetes is affecting over 29 million people in the United States.  That's 10% of every man, woman and child and according to the Centers for Disease Control, another 86 million have pre-diabetes and some don't even know it.  Of the $245 Billion being spent annually on the treatment of diabetes and its complications you can bet some of that money is coming out of your health plan.  At Custom Benefits Solutions, we work with our employer clients to develop a wellness strategy that helps employees with diabetes to better manage that disease and reduce their employer's financial burden associated with it.  #custombenefitswork

Stress Comes from Many Sources

Stress Comes from Many Sources

Research has shown that employee engagement is clearly linked to an employee's well-being, so it makes sense that companies are focusing on wellness initiatives. But a person's well-being is impacted by much more than their physical health. What about mental and emotional health? Many employees experience near-constant stress because of financial, medical and legal issues that can eat away at their overall well-being and even cause physical issues like high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.

Communication is they key...but you have to fundamentally change how you do it.

Communication is they key...but you have to fundamentally change how you do it.

As Bill Gates once said, “We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next 10. Don't let yourself be lulled into inaction.”