Expanding Wellness Plans

How Running a High-Performing Health Plan is Like Driving a Toyota Prius--and that's a good thing!

I finally got myself a Prius which I’ve been wanting for a long time.  Watching the technology “do it’s thing” in the background while I drive really got my "wheels turning” (pardon the pun) about how health plans with great design and technology behind the scenes are similar.

I finally got myself a Prius which I’ve been wanting for a long time. Watching the technology “do it’s thing” in the background while I drive really got my "wheels turning” (pardon the pun) about how health plans with great design and technology behind the scenes are similar.

For about a decade my Mom had a Toyota Prius.  She absolutely loved it and I got to drive it from time to time.  Sometimes I’d meet up with her midway between my NC home and her SC home and I’d swap my GMC Yukon loaded down with my kids and our clothes for the weekend.  Then I’d get to drive the Prius around visiting a few clients on the way to reunite with them in SC.  I loved scooting around in that little thing and set my sights on owning one someday.

Well, it finally happened.  This week I became the proud owner of a cute pearl white Prius and I couldn’t be happier.  There were 9 miles on it when I drove it off the lot and today (2 days later) there are 400 miles on it.  Funny thing is, half of the “free” tank of gas the dealership put in still remains.  I’m in love.

I’m sure I know what you’re thinking…”but you’re supposed to be a successful benefits broker.  Can’t you afford anything better than a Prius?”  Trust me, with the abuse I put my work car through, I can’t be trusted with a car worth any more than this.  It’s just not a good idea.  After all, I’m not Contorno with his big, fancy car and his personal driver.

Yesterday, as I was driving, I began to pay close attention to the monitors and displays that light up with every touch of the gas pedal.  It shows me when the battery is providing all the power, when the power is coming from a mix of battery and gas and when the car is using 100% gas.  This really got my “wheels turning” (pardon the pun).

I was reminded of how a transparent, high performing health plan works and how a successfully run plan only spends about half as much as a traditionally funded plan that has no view into the actual unit cost of healthcare.  What I’ve told clients and prospects is that because of the technology operating behind a transparent, high-performing plan, it allows the plan to save money even when you’re using the high cost sources of funding like hospitals and facilities.  On the other end of the spectrum, you completely level out your exposure to claims costs (why don’t we call this renewable energy) by embedding Direct Primary Care into your plan design.  That’s just like when your Prius is only using the battery to get you from point A to point B.  Everything in between is a mix of great technology and a smarter use of your plan’s resources.  Just like the gas in your car.

Why is this so important?  Well, we all know that the Kaiser Family Foundation just reported that American families and employers are spending around 67% more on healthcare than they were 10 years ago.  Healthcare has exponentially outpaced inflation and it’s killing our economy, causing wage stagnation and keeping workers from being able to retire on time.

Why do we tolerate this?  Because big insurers are marketing geniuses.  And we bought it hook, line and sinker.  Even though the net promoter score of the major insurers is in the single digits, many American employers are too afraid to design a plan that isn’t run by one of them.  Until now.

At a very grassroots level, employers of all sizes and makeups are seeing the Direct Primary Care practices build a presence in their communities.  Many seek out that care and then decide they want to try it out for themselves.  They’re hooked instantly.  They want to provide it as an option to the rest of their workforce.  They ask their current broker to help them implement it and that’s where the difficulties start.  They hear things like, “this is just an added expense” or “your employees already have all of the doctors in the network” or “this won’t work with your health savings account”. 

As a Health Rosetta Advisor that’s music to my ears.  My most recent client acquisition told me just before I was hired that it was refreshing to hear someone say “yes you can” when cost containment solutions like DPC, transparent pharmacy benefits and bundled surgical agreements were inserted into the conversation.  They told me all they heard from their incumbent broker was how the status quo was the best they could do. 

But not all employers are so bold.  Many are too afraid that their employees are going to revolt at the mere mention of a different insurer.  Well, I’ll just describe the open enrollment meeting at this new client.  The changes were explained, the booklets were passed out, heads knodded, frowns turned to smiles and several employees were giving high fives to the CFO as they walked out of the conference room.  I’d say those employees were pretty happy with those changes.  Here’s the difference.  Instead of employees being given bad news, they were told the following:  “your primary care visits are free” and “your generic prescriptions can likely be dispensed right in your DPC provider’s office, no need for a separate trip to the pharmacy” and “if you follow the surgical advocate’s recommendation of the high-quality provider for your procedure, it’ll be no cost to you.”  I’m no genius, but that sounds a whole lot better than “copays, deductibles, co-insurance and premiums are going up again.”

What’s my point?  As an employer you have options.  More importantly, so do your employees.  Someday you may have to come to the sad reality that your outdated benefits package just cost you the great new hire you were recruiting.  When that day comes you know where to reach me.  I’ll show up in my cute, pearl white Toyota Prius that got me there at a rate of about 60 miles per gallon.

Fitness Incentive Program Ideas

Corporate fitness programs not only build camaraderie and morale, they can improve company bottom lines considerably. Improved worker health results in lower absenteeism, improved productivity, decreased health care costs and fewer lawsuits, according to the Wellness Council of America. Incentives and contests can help your company increase employee participation in wellness programs.

Benefits

A corporate fitness program improves employee health in several ways. Workers lose weight, reduce stress, lower blood pressure and sleep better. All of these can reduce sick days, doctor visit and workplace injuries. For example, lower-back injuries cause employees to miss 100 million work days annually, according to the Wellness Council of America. The DuPont corporation decreased disability days at its Tennessee plant by 14 percent after instituting a wellness program, saving almost $120,000 annually.

Motivation

While employee education is an important part of any corporate wellness program, a fitness incentive program motivates employees to participate. Holding a team competition or offering cash or other prizes can create a buzz throughout your workplace and get more employees participating.

Team Competitions

One way to increase fitness program participation is to create a team contest. You can draw names at random to create teams, pit management against staff, place workers from different departments on teams to create more interaction or have different offices face off against each other.

Weight-loss Challenge

Weight loss is one aspect of fitness that concerns or interests many people. Create a weight-loss challenge as either an individual contest or team competition. You can award a prize or prizes based on total number of pounds lost or percentage of individual or team weight lost.

Fitness Challenge

If you don't want to focus on weight loss only, have a broader fitness competition. Track total number of verifiable hours participants exercised during the competition period, how much each person or team lowered their cholesterol or a fitness challenge, with participants or teams competing in tests such as number of sit-ups and push-ups, minutes on a treadmill or jumping rope, timed laps swum or other measurements. Work with a fitness professional and your insurance company to create a test that is safe for all participants.

Incentives

You can use a variety of incentives to motivate employees to participate in a fitness program. You can award cash prizes, trips, gift certificates, extra vacation days or other tangible rewards. You can add prestige with winners names on plaques displayed at headquarters, a mention in the company newsletter and press releases sent to local papers. With team events, the winning team might get to name the charity that receives a donation from the company. Whenever you award prizes, make sure the rules are clear, the judging criteria are objective and that all employees are eligible -- if you set up a contest for one department or employees with more than one year's service, you may create ill will among other employees.

Originally published by www.livestrong.com

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Custom Benefits Solutions Expands Services

Custom Benefits Solutions Expands Services

With the desperate need to control healthcare costs, employers are eager to have a solution that allows them the advantage of large numbers but the autonomy to create their own destiny.  The current constraints and opaque pricing models of the provider-payer relationship as well as “secret” PPO contracts have yielded a healthcare system that is confusing, hard to navigate and, in some situations, bankrupting to healthcare consumers. These days it takes an employee benefits consultant who understands how to think around problems before they ever really become problems.

Employers are Calling for Innovative Solutions

Employers are Calling for Innovative Solutions

Perhaps the most notable change in this movement toward self-funding is the number of smaller employers getting in the game. Although most of these are level-funded arrangements, employers see the value in gaining control of their plan with a focus on what’s important to their specific employee base. Plus, the tax advantage isn’t bad either, as state taxes are eliminated on most self-insured plans. 

Winning the War on Diabetes

Winning the War on Diabetes

Diabetes is affecting over 29 million people in the United States.  That's 10% of every man, woman and child and according to the Centers for Disease Control, another 86 million have pre-diabetes and some don't even know it.  Of the $245 Billion being spent annually on the treatment of diabetes and its complications you can bet some of that money is coming out of your health plan.  At Custom Benefits Solutions, we work with our employer clients to develop a wellness strategy that helps employees with diabetes to better manage that disease and reduce their employer's financial burden associated with it.  #custombenefitswork

Stress Comes from Many Sources

Stress Comes from Many Sources

Research has shown that employee engagement is clearly linked to an employee's well-being, so it makes sense that companies are focusing on wellness initiatives. But a person's well-being is impacted by much more than their physical health. What about mental and emotional health? Many employees experience near-constant stress because of financial, medical and legal issues that can eat away at their overall well-being and even cause physical issues like high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.

Accolades...

Cristy Gupton has been honored by the National Association of Health Underwriters with the Leading Producer's Round Table Soaring Eagle Award.  The Leading Producer's Round Table sets apart leaders in the benefits industry as experts in their trade and professionals who have a very respectable level of success. 

Employers Should Take the Lead in Weight Loss

We spend 8+ hours per day in the workplace.  Does that leave a reasonable amount of time to spend at the gym afterwards?  Let's be honest...not usually.  Here's how we can do better...